Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Aids drugs resistance growing - study

23 July 2012, 16:16

 Paris - Resistance to Aids drugs, a problem that has been widely feared over the last decade, is growing in parts of Africa but should not hamper the life-saving drug rollout, researchers reported on Monday.

Tiny genetic mutations that make HIV immune to key frontline drugs have been increasing in eastern and southern Africa, something that should be a clear warning to health watchdogs, they said.

"Without continued and increased national and international efforts, rising HIV drug resistance could jeopardise a decade-long trend of decreasing HIV/Aids-related illness and death in low- and middle-income countries," they said.

The study, published in The Lancet, is funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the European Union (EU).

Eight years

It is the widest-ever analysis of a risk that has haunted Aids campaigners since 2003, when drugs started to be rolled out to poorer countries that are home to more than 90% of people with the Aids virus.

The nightmare is that - as with bacteria which become resistant to antibiotics - strains of HIV will emerge that will blunt the armoury of antiretrovirals, leaving millions defenceless.

Silvia Bertagnolio from the UN's World Health Organisation and Ravindra Gupta at University College London looked at published cases of HIV resistance and supplemented this with data from the WHO itself.

Over eight years, prevalence of a resistant virus in untreated people soared from around 1% to 7.3% in eastern Africa, and from 1% to 3.7% in southern Africa, they found.

Similar rates of 3.5% to 7.6% were also found in western and central Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean.

Strains of HIV-1

The difference, though, is that they remained quite stable throughout this period, and did not experience such a big rise.

The mutations were found in strains of HIV-1 virus that made them resistant to a class of drugs called non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, or NNRTIs.

These are the first-option treatments for HIV infection and are also used to prevent transmission of the virus from a pregnant woman to her foetus.

If a patient is resistant to the drug, the risks of sickness and death rise in line with levels of virus.

Further treatment options do exist beyond NNRTIs, but these second-line regimens are often far costlier.

Step up

The paper says countries should step up monitoring of HIV resistance and take steps to guard against start-stop treatment that fuels the problem.

They can do this by ensuring that drug supplies are not interrupted and by beefing up monitoring of patients to encourage them to follow the daily pill-taking regimen.

Despite the concern, the rollout should carry on, says the paper.

"Estimated levels, although increasing, are not unexpected in view of the large expansion of antiretroviral treatment coverage seen in low-income and middle-income countries - no changes in antiretroviral treatment guidelines are warranted at the moment."

Around 33 million people around the world have HIV.

In 2011, about eight million badly infected people in poorer countries had access to HIV-suppressing drugs, a figure 26 times greater than the number in 2003 but still only just over half of those in need.

The report coincided with the 19th International Aids conference, a six-day event running in Washington until Friday.


Tags hiv aids

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...