Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Central African sugar factory reopens amid strife

09 June 2014, 07:36

Ngakobo - A sugar refinery - the wartorn Central African Republic's biggest factory - is back in business after soldiers recaptured it from former rebels who occupied it for more than a year.

In a rare boost to the impoverished nation's battered economy, the plant's 150 employees are back on the job in Ngakobo in the east of the former French colony - with African peacekeepers providing security.

They had fled to the capital Bangui amid sectarian violence sparked by a March 2013 coup by the mainly Muslim Seleka movement.

"We had no more work, no more money. We were bored, so we are happy to be back," said 30-year-old Solange Ngortene, a secretary at the factory.

Under a blazing sun, workers are busy cutting sugar cane on four hectares (10 acres) of rolling green fields. They would go on to cut 200 tonnes of raw cane that day, enough to produce 20 tonnes of sugar worth some 20,000 euros ($27,000).

"I was unemployed for more than a year. I was only getting between 10 and 30 percent of my gross salary. That wasn't easy with a family to provide for," Ngortene told AFP.

Like many employees of factory operator Sucaf, Ngortene fled with her family to Bangui when the Seleka seized swathes of the landlocked African state in December 2012.

The Seleka, a predominantly Muslim rebel militia, looted the refinery, which normally produces 11,000 tonnes of sugar a year, and then commandeered it as their eastern base.

Their coup three months later plunged the country into chaos, eventually displacing a quarter of the 4.6 million population.

After seizing power, some of the rebels went rogue and embarked on a campaign of killing, raping and looting.

The abuses prompted members of the Christian majority to form vigilante groups called "anti-balaka," or anti-machete in the local language, unleashing a wave of brutal tit-for-tat killings.

Fifteen months on, Seleka has been chased from power following intervention by French and African troops, leaving the economy of the mineral-rich nation -- already on its knees following decades of neglect and corruption -- in ruins.

While the former rebels still control the area surrounding the refinery, the plant itself was recaptured in an operation involving 30 African peacekeepers in a force known as MISCA and 60 hired private guards. By the end of April, the factory was ready to reopen.

- Fighters, armed nomads -

"The factory is going well," says Sylvestre Serelgue, wearing blue overalls outside the mechanical workshop he helps to operate. "Our brothers from MISCA are providing security. We feel at ease in the factory."

The problem, he says, is the local Fulani tribesmen, nomadic herders who are armed and directed by Seleka.

"The Fulani really bother us. They attack the staff in their neighbourhoods. There are 15 or 20 of them and they take our money," Serelgue says.

Gabonese MISCA officers explain that the some 15 Seleka rebels controlling Ngakobo have recruited the Fulani to rob area residents.

"Many employees who sought refuge in Bangui after fleeing the Seleka came back here when it became even more dangerous" in the capital, says Akroma Ehvitchi, the factory's Ivorian site manager.

"They returned alone, without their families, as there's no transport and there are still security problems."

Employees send money back to their families in Bangui aboard the company plane, "but the salary isn't enough," according to Prosper, a 42-year-old day labourer. He earns 1,100 CAR francs (1.60 euros, $2.20) a day -- barely enough to buy a kilo of sugar.

"It's not much," acknowledges Sucaf boss Thomas Reynaud. "But in some families you have five or six people who work here.

"The goal is to restart production to save the site," says the young Frenchman, who was hosting a delegation of diplomats and military officials from Bangui.

Ehvitchi, leaving the factory aboard a company pickup truck, preferred to make light of CAR's plight of widespread violence and abject poverty.

"In such a situation if you understand what's happening it means it has not been well explained to you," Ehvitchi says with a laugh.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...