Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Cheers, relief as Taylor found guilty

26 April 2012, 13:26

Freetown - Sierra Leoneans cheered or quietly let the news sink in Thursday as ex-Liberian president Charles Taylor was convicted of aiding and abetting a terror campaign by rebels during their country's 11-year civil war.

Victims, leaders and civil society representatives packed the headquarters of the Special Court for Sierra Leone, a modern building in the lush, hilly capital, to watch on monitors as the verdict unfolded in a courtroom in the Dutch capital thousands of miles away.

Al Hadji Jusu Jarka, former chairperson of the amputees association, watched the nearly 2-hour judgement stony-faced, using his prosthetic arms to clasp a handkerchief to wipe his face in the heat.
"I am happy ... I feel justice has been done," he said, after calmly listening to judge Richard Lussick announce Taylor was guilty of arming the rebels who in 1999 hacked off first his left, then his right arm as he was pinned to a mango tree.

"We as victims expect that Taylor will be given 100 years or more in prison," he added. Sentencing will take place on May 30.

While victims quietly filed out of the courtroom, another hall packed with victims and tribal chiefs from around the country erupted into cheers as they turned to congratulate each other.

"People were so happy," said PC Kaimpumu, paramount chief for the southern Bonthe district, adding that he was "perfectly pleased."

The verdict served as a warning to the country that "you can't just commit crimes without impunity."

Mohammed Bah, 35, who was forced to become a combatant at aged 24 and also later had his left arm amputated during the war, said he "feels great" over the decision.

However others felt Taylor's conviction did nothing to change the hardships they had been through.

"You can try Taylor, jail him, but what about us the victims? What will now happen to us?" asked Ken Sesay, who lost his left leg. "Why aren't we being helped."



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...