Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


DRC warlord verdict a test for flagging ICC

07 March 2014, 06:57

Amsterdam - The International Criminal Court passes judgment on alleged Democratic republic of Congo warlord Germain Katanga on Friday in a key test of the prosecutors' ability to bring solid cases and win convictions at the Hague-based tribunal.

The court, launched in 2002 to try crimes against humanity, has handed down only two verdicts so far - a conviction and an acquittal - while at least five cases have collapsed for lack of sufficient evidence before or during trial proceedings.

Apart from accusations of slow justice, the court has also suffered from criticism that it has so far only brought charges against Africans while atrocities in conflicts in the politically-charged Middle East go unpunished.

Friday's case stems from a bloody conflict in the resource-rich Ituri region of northeast DRC in the early 2000s.

Katanga was charged with 10 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity for an attack on a village there called Bogoro by a militia group he allegedly commanded, the Patriotic Resistance Force. He could face a life sentence if convicted.

He was charged alongside Mathieu Ngudjolo Chui, another militia leader who was acquitted for lack of evidence last year.

Judges separated Katanga's case before the verdict and gave prosecutors another year to gather more evidence that he had contributed to the crimes, not that he was central to them as originally charged.

"If they don't clear this lower bar, it will put a question mark over the organisation of the trial," said Carsten Stahn, a law professor at Leiden University. "Even if they do end up with a conviction, it will remain a fragile basis for conviction."

Questions about evidence

The court, which has a budget of at least €100m, is now preparing to try Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, accused of orchestrating clashes after 2007 elections in which 1 200 died.

Kenyatta denies the charges but will co-operate even as his government lobbies hard to have his trial dropped or postponed.

Although more than 100 nations have recognised the court's jurisdiction, brutal conflicts such as the one in Syria remain beyond its reach because Damascus didn't join the court before it descended into a civil war that has killed more than 140 000 and displaced millions more.

At least 200 people were killed in the attack on Bogoro in February 2003, when ethnic Lendu and Ngiti fighters destroyed the homes of the village's mainly Hema inhabitants.

Some testimony prosecutors used in this latest trial was criticised as faulty by the judges when it was presented in the case against Ngudjolo that ended in acquittal last year. So much will depend on prosecutors' reinvestigations over the past year.

In last year's verdict, judges criticised prosecutors for such lapses as failing to visit the site of the attack and not checking what witnesses would have been able to see from the vantage points that they claimed to have had.

Fatou Bensouda, appointed chief prosecutor two years ago, has since boosted the court's investigative teams and sought funds for forensic experts and other skilled investigators.

If the judges convict Katanga, it would lend badly needed support to her new approach.

"An acquittal would be a blow, but there's been a change in leadership and they've publicly acknowledged they need to take another look at their investigative strategies," said Jennifer Easterday of the Open Society Justice Initiative.

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...