Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Egypt women wage war against abuse

06 March 2013, 10:30

Cairo - Faced with a spike in sexual violence against female protesters, Egyptian women are overcoming stigma and recounting painful testimonies to force silent authorities and a reticent society to confront "sexual terrorism".

The victims of the attacks have been talking openly about their ordeals, insisting they will not be intimidated by a campaign they believe is aimed at shunning them from public life.

"We are not victims, we are revolutionaries. What happened to us has made us stronger and we will continue" to take to the streets, said activist Aida al-Kashef.

Harassment of women is by no means new on Egypt's streets, where they were often the target of verbal abuse and sometimes groping.

But since the revolution that toppled long-time president Hosni Mubarak in 2011, the problem has snowballed, with women now being regularly attacked by mobs of men in and around Tahrir Square.

The attackers have stripped women of their clothes with knives, sexually assaulted them and penetrated them with their fingers.

Yasmine al-Baramawy, who was assaulted in November, highlighted the degree of violence when during a talk show she held up the ripped trousers she wore the day she was attacked.

"They gathered around me and started ripping my clothes off with knives," Baramawy told AFP.

She was then dragged several hundred metres, while being touched and groped, until residents of neighbouring area saved her from the crowd.

"I didn't feel sad or feel that my pride had been damaged. I felt angry, and I want justice," Baramawy said.

Politically motivated attacks

Outraged Egyptians came together to form groups such as Operation Anti Sexual Harassment and Tahrir Bodyguard that bring together volunteers to intervene to stop the attacks in Tahrir Square where police are largely absent.

The groups also offer medical and psychological support to the victims.

On January 25, as thousands of Egyptians marked the second anniversary of their uprising, at least 19 women were assaulted, according to Operation Anti Sexual Harassment.

Some argue the attacks are politically motivated.

"These attacks aim to exclude women from public life and punish them for participating in political activism and demonstrations. They are also an attempt to ruin the image of Tahrir Square and demonstrators in general," said the group.

"This phenomenon requires urgent attention and treatment, and is linked to the broader social problem of endemic and daily sexual harassment and assault of women," it said.

"We do not want to use the term 'harassment.' What is happening today is sexual terrorism," said Inas Mekkawy, a women's rights activist with the group Baheya.

'Indifference and scorn'

A large part of the problem lies in the indifference of the authorities and society's scorn.

"They ask the victim: 'What were you doing in Tahrir? How were you dressed? What time did you go?" Soraya Bahgat of Tahrir Bodyguard told AFP.

Another member of the group, Ahmed Shokri, who intervened in "six or seven" of such attacks, recounts one of the incidents.

"Some people had belts in their hand, others had knives. You don't know who is doing what. We try to form a cordon around the women and try to pull them [to safety] into the entrance of a building or a shop," he told AFP.

"The problem is that there are people who say they are coming to help, but we don't know if it's true.

"That day, five men told me: 'I'm the brother of the girl.' I believed the first one, but then there was a second then a third then a fourth. I understood then that these people know what they're doing," Shokri said.

To the fury of many activists, members of Egypt's upper house - the Islamist-dominated Shura Council - recently heaped blame on the victims because they "know they are going somewhere where there are thugs," according to local press reports.

One senator even called for the segregation of men and women during demonstrations, while another said the tents used for the sit-ins in Tahrir Square had become a place of prostitution.

Abu Islam, a controversial Islamic preacher who owns a satellite television channel described the women as "naked, non-veiled", and said they go to Tahrir "to get raped".

The National Council for Women said it had been tasked by the prime minister with drafting a comprehensive law against all forms of violence against women.

But activists say they are sceptical about the impact of such a law in the absence of a real will to apply it.


Tags egypt

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...