Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


French, Malian troops hunt fleeing rebels

28 January 2013, 14:31

Gao - French-backed Malian troops searched through Timbuktu for Islamist rebel fighters on Monday after seizing the airport and surrounding the ancient Saharan trading town in a lightning offensive against al-Qaeda-allied fighters in northern Mali.

"We are in control of the airport in Timbuktu and forces are in the process of securing the town," Mali's Defence Ministry spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Diarran Kone told Reuters.

In a commando operation similar to the one at the weekend that seized Gao, the other large northern Malian town occupied by Islamist insurgents since last year, French special forces backed by warplanes and helicopters swooped on Timbuktu airport to open the way for Malian and other African troops.

France 24 TV, reporting from Timbuktu airport, said about 200 French paratroopers had been dropped north of the Unesco World Heritage Site city to try to stop any remaining Islamic rebels from fleeing in that direction.

The weekend gains made at Gao and Timbuktu by the French and Malian troops capped a two-week whirlwind intervention by France in its former Sahel colony, which has driven al-Qaeda-allied militant fighters northwards into the desert and mountains.

"Little by little, Mali is being liberated," French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius told France 2 television.

The French and Malians have faced no resistance so far at Timbuktu, but Malian government soldiers face a tough job of combing through the city's labyrinth of ancient mosques and monuments and mud-brick homes between alleys to flush out any Islamist fighters who might still be hiding there.

Gao residents celebrate

At Gao, more than 300km east of Timbuktu, thousands of jubilant residents danced to music in the streets to celebrate the liberation of the ancient town on the Niger River from the sharia-observing Islamist rebels.

A third northern town, the Tuareg seat of Kidal, in Mali's rugged and remote northeast, remains in rebel hands.

As the French and Malian troops push into northern Mali, African troops from a UN-backed continental intervention force expected to number 7 700 are being flown into the country, despite delays due to logistical problems.

France now has 2 900 armed forces personnel on the ground in Mali. It sent them in with warplanes, helicopters and armoured vehicles after the Malian government appealed to Paris for help when the Islamist rebels launched an offensive south towards the capital Bamako early in January.

In the face of the two-week-old French-Malian counter attack, the rebels have been pulling back north into the trackless desert wastes and mountain fastnesses of the Sahara.

Military experts fear they could carry on a gruelling hit-and-run guerrilla war against the government from there.

Fabius said the Islamist insurgents, members of a loose alliance between al-Qaeda's North African wing Aqim and Malian and other groups, were going into hiding but could reappear.

"The terrorist groups are carrying out a strategy of evasion and some of them could return in the north, primarily in Mali," Fabius warned. He declined to say whether France would intervene again if the militants returned.

The United States and European Union are backing the French-led Mali operation as a strike against the threat of radical Islamist jihadists using the West African state's inhospitable Sahara desert as a launch pad for international attacks.

They are helping with intelligence, airlift of troops and logistics, but do not plan to send combat troops to Mali.

- Reuters

Tags france mali

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...