Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Kenyan tourist island braces for attack fallout

20 June 2014, 10:51

Lamu - Kenya's resort island of Lamu has almost everything a tourist could want: white sand beaches, ancient Unesco-listed architecture and year-round sunshine.

Cruelly missing, however, is a sense of security, and this week's massacres in a nearby town and village could be the death knell for the tourism sector and a key source of income for thousands of people.

"It's totally dead," said Ziwa Abdallah Mohamed, who has worked as a tour guide on Lamu island since the early 1970s, a time when it was a hippy destination.

Back then, hundreds would arrive each day on the docks of the ancient town of Lamu, where only donkeys and motorbikes can fit down the narrow winding streets.

Visitors would sleep on the rooftops of tower houses little changed for centuries, overlooking the blue sea of the Indian Ocean, where traditional sailing boats cruised the waters.

The massacres in and around Mpeketoni - about 30km from the island - were not the first disaster to hit the area. Three years ago, the kidnapping by Somali gunmen of a French woman from close to the island, and the seizure of two British tourists from closer to Somalia, kept visitors away.

But the numbers were slowly creeping back up, with the island gearing up for its busiest period beginning in July until March.

Then gunmen late on Sunday launched an attack on the mainland town of Mpeketoni, followed by a second assault on Monday, leaving at least 60 dead. Many fear it is the final straw.

"I don't think we're going to have any tourists here anymore," Mohamed said mournfully.

'Our economy is tourism'

The attacks were claimed by Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked Shabaab, although President Uhuru Kenyatta has instead blamed the carnage on "local political networks" along with an "opportunist network of other criminal gangs".

Whoever is to blame, those on the island say their livelihoods are on the line.

"We had a great summer season last year and we were looking forward to this new season," said boat captain Aswif Omar, who ferries tourists along the mangrove-lined channels for fishing trips and sunset cruises.

"I was to be busy all next month," he said, noting that two weddings, each with large numbers of guests set to fly in, had been cancelled after the attacks made international headlines.

"Tourism is the main source of income in Lamu," he added.

The large hotels and high-end villas in the island's Shela village, famed for its vast beach that stretches as far as the eye can see, are almost all empty until at least August.

In one major hotel, of nearly 30 reservations for July, only two have not cancelled, and employees in some places have been asked to stay home "until further notice."

Workers at the famous Peponi Hotel in Shela, open since 1967, are defiant, assuring that the legendary seafront establishment would open on 1 July, like every year.

But many of the rich European and American owners - including many celebrities - of luxury beachfront villas have not been seen for a while, Mohamed said.

In the old town of Lamu, described by Unesco as the oldest and best-preserved Swahili settlement in East Africa, the situation is no better.

Jeff Yaa, manager of the Hotel Bahari, a modest property with 16 rooms, said that a group of Germans - regular visitors to the island - had just cancelled their annual visit.

Between 70 to 80% of Lamu's 20 000 residents live directly from the tourist economy, Mohamed said, but added that almost everyone depends on the industry in some form.

"Our economy is tourism, everything here depends on it," he said.

"The two activities in Lamu are fishing and tourism, but if there's no tourism, fishing for who? If there's no tourists, there's no restaurant to buy fish."



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...