Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Military officers to head militias

25 September 2012, 11:31

Tripoli - Libya's military command appointed on Monday a pair of army officers to head two powerful Islamist militias in the country's east, part of the government's efforts to rein in armed factions amid popular demands that the groups disband.

The move reflects the pressure on the government to control the country's militias, many of which it had relied on for securing the country in the turmoil following last year's ouster and killing of longtime leader Muammar Gaddafi.

Colonel Ali al-Sheikhi, the spokesperson for Libya's joint chiefs of staff, told the news agency LANA that the chiefs of the Rafallah Sahati Brigade and the February 17 Brigade, two groups authorities had allowed to manage security in the eastern city of Benghazi, would be replaced with army commanders.

Anger at the militias boiled over following the killing of the top American diplomat in Libya and three US mission staffers in an assault on the consulate in Benghazi on 11 September. The attack followed an angry protest against an anti-Islam film produced in the US which has riled many Muslims in the region.

Members of the radical Islamist Ansar al-Shariah militia are suspected of being behind the attack.

More groups sprang up

Many of those militias were formed in the eight-month war against Gaddafi, but more groups sprang up after the end of the war in October. With the country trying to rebuild after 42 years of Gaddafi, the groups paid little attention to successive interim leaders. They were accused of bullying citizens, operating independent prisons, and holding summary trials for Gaddafi loyalists. Recently, Islamist-led militias have also attacked shrines, such as tombs associated with religious figures, that they considered to be counter to their strict view of Islam.

This Friday, thousands of protesters marched against the militias in Benghazi, the cradle of the revolution against Gaddafi, and stormed two of their compounds. Militiamen at the Sahati Brigade's compound fired at the protesters, killing nearly a dozen.

In an attempt to deflect the anger, Libya's president ordered all militias to dissolve or to come under a joint operation command to co-ordinate between the militia brigades and the army. The military already asked all armed groups using captured Gaddafi-era barracks to evacuate them and hand them over. Security forces have already raided a number of sites in the capital Tripoli used by militias.

The moves surprised some critics who doubted that the government was strong enough to deal with the militias, particularly the powerful Islamist ones.

But many Libyans still feel the government has not done enough.

Retain some groups

In Benghazi, around 200 people rallied against the militias on Monday, decrying the government decision to retain some of the armed groups even if they were under military command. The protest demanded that all militias be disbanded and its members integrated in the security agencies as individuals.

The protesters also demanded an independent investigation into the killing of protesters on Saturday, saying that the government bears responsibility for the actions of a militia upon which it had relied for security.

"The blood of the martyrs will not be shed in vain," the protesters chanted. They called for the chief of staff, defence and interior ministers to be sacked.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...