Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Nairobi attack spotlights mall safety

26 September 2013, 07:31

New York - Some malls around the world have been scrambling to add security guards to look for suspicious people following a deadly attack on a shopping centre in Nairobi over the weekend. But for other malls, it's been business as usual.

The mixed reactions by malls across the globe isn't unusual in an industry whose security efforts vary from unarmed guards in most shopping centers in the US to metal detectors and bag searches in places like Israel to main entrances that resemble airport security lines in India.

The disparity offers a glimpse at why any moves following the Nairobi incident to increase mall security in countries that have less strict procedures aren't likely to last: The industry continues to struggle with how to keep shoppers safe without scaring them away.

"No one wants, when you go shopping, to be strip searched, to be interviewed in a room by a security guard," said Simon Bennett, director, Civil Safety and Security Unit at the University of Leicester in England. "That might be acceptable in aviation, but it is not in commercial retail."

Security concerns come after 12 to 15 al-Shabaab militants, wielding grenades, took control of Westgate mall in Nairobi. Terrorists held Kenya security forces for four days, killing at least 67 civilians and government troops and injuring 175 others. The Kenyan government said on Tuesday that the attackers were defeated, with several suspects killed or arrested.

In the aftermath, security was tight at the Junction Mall in Nairobi. Two of three entry gates were locked shut. Cars were searched more carefully than usual, with guards looking in glove compartments. Two armed soldiers were stationed inside the mall and mall security guards who search patrons with metal detector wands at entry points said the soldiers had been deployed after the Westgate attack.

In the US, the International Council of Shopping Centres, a trade group of shopping centres representing about one third of retail space globally, said the US government's Department of Homeland Security is reaching out to corporate security at all malls.

At the same time, the group said some of the malls in the US and South Africa are beefing up private security personnel, while others are bringing in more off duty police officers. Mall of America, the biggest US mall, added extra uniformed security officers and stepped up other measures, but officials at the Bloomington, Minn-based mall declined to elaborate. "We will ... remain vigilant as we always do in similar situations," said Dan Jasper, a mall spokesperson.


In general, US malls focus on reacting to a shooting more than preventing one. Malls depend on private security personnel, most of whom don't carry guns, though they do work with local police. And while they're trained to look for suspicious behaviour and report that to authorities, they're discouraged from intervening.

"Shoppers at this point perhaps don't have an appetite for extraordinary measures," said Kenneth Hamilton, executive vice president of IPC International, the largest provider of shopping centre security of malls in the US.

Indeed, heightened security hasn't been welcomed in US malls. The International Council of Shopping Centres spent $2m to develop a terrorism training program after the Sept 2011 terrorist attacks in the US. But surveys conducted by the group following the attacks show that people don't want to be subjected to metal detectors and bag searches at malls.

Jeff Wohl, 45, of Atlanta, said on Tuesday that while he's horrified by the Nairobi attack, he doesn't want to go through bag checks at malls. "Any public gathering ... can become a target," he said. "But you have to live your life."

US malls have made changes to their security strategies following attacks. A shooting on 5 December, 2007 at the Westroads Mall in Omaha, Neb., for instance, was an impetus for malls to change how they deal with shooters themselves.

After a 19-year-old man shot and killed eight people and injured five others before taking his own life, malls began working with Homeland Security on a plan to have the first responders from the police department enter the building to stop the shooter and free those who are trapped rather than wait for backup.

Many mall operators now also have evacuation drills once or twice a year that focus on lockdown situations. A growing number of malls also use cameras that scan licence plates in parking lots. And many malls use technology that enables them to share three-dimensional virtual blue prints of their layout with law enforcement.

The reaction to attacks can be more muted in other parts of the world. In China and Hong Kong, malls are operating normally following the Nairobi attack, typically monitored by closed-circuit cameras and with unarmed private security guards stationed throughout.

Zero risk

"We review our security system and conduct emergency drills regularly to ensure that we are ready to respond to any breach of security swiftly and effectively," said Elizabeth Kok, Retail Portfolio Director at Swire Properties, which operates three upmarket malls in Hong Kong.

At the busy PPR shopping mall in downtown Shanghai, a security guard who gave only his surname, Zhang, said he saw no need for any heightened security. "I can say that the possibility of the same kind of thing happening here is almost zero," he said. "Everyone knows that China prohibits guns, and Shanghai is such a safe city."

In Australia, a similar sentiment was expressed. Tobias Feakin, senior analyst for national security at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute, said malls in Australia would likely make a point of ensuring their security staff will operate on a heightened level of awareness in light of the attacks.

But given the relatively low risk of terrorism in Australia, it's unlikely they'll make major security changes.

Meanwhile, Michael Green, chief executive of the British Council of Shopping Centres, a mall trade group, said that they work closely with police forces like Scotland Yard and would respond to warnings with appropriate measures. But they don't want to make malls like prisons.

"We have to make them welcoming," he said.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...