Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Rebels seek to re-assert power in Mali

08 February 2013, 07:36

Dakar - The Tuareg rebels who unleashed Mali's descent into chaos are seeking to reassert themselves on the political scene now that French-led troops have routed the Islamists who hijacked their rebellion.

The Azawad National Liberation Movement (MNLA) precipitated Mali's unravelling on 17 January 2012, when its members - many armed with weapons recently brought back from Libya, where they fought for slain dictator Muammar Gaddafi - launched a rebellion in the north.

It was the latest in a long line of uprisings among the Tuareg, a traditionally nomadic North African people who have fought Mali's central government on and off since the country gained independence from France in 1960.

After teaming up with armed Islamist extremists in the region and humiliating the Malian army - so badly that a group of mid-level officers staged a coup d'etat on 22 March, exacerbating the chaos - the MNLA declared independence for the new state of Azawad, the Tuareg name for their homeland.

But their alliance with the Islamists was short-lived.

More interested in sharia than independence, the al-Qaeda-linked groups overpowered the MNLA and planted their own black flags across the north, ruling their territory with brutal repression until France sent in fighter jets, attack helicopters and 4 000 troops to drive them out.

Amid the ongoing conflict, the MNLA has sought to re-assert its relevance, claiming to have "chased the terrorists from several towns in Azawad" and passed along intelligence to French forces "top terrorist officials" it said it had arrested.

Functional relations

The group also said it had welcomed French troops in "full brotherhood" into the north-eastern town of Kidal, the last Islamist bastion to fall.

The MNLA called on France not to let Mali's own troops secure Kidal, a request Paris appeared to grant, giving the job to 1 800 Chadian soldiers.

French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said France had "functional relations" with the MNLA but that fighting terrorists alongside them was "not our objective".

The MNLA runs a vigorous public relations campaign from France and Burkina Faso.

Observers say it gets a boost - particularly in France - from the mythic image of the Tuareg, or Kel Tamasheq, a fiercely independent people who have lived in the region for 2 000 years and are known as the "masters of the desert".

Some say the MNLA has hijacked that mystique.

"Why do the media get so carried away when they talk about the Tuareg community?" asked Foreign Minister Mohammed Bazou of Niger, which also has a large Tuareg population.

"The MNLA doesn't represent the Tuareg. They've never been elected by anyone. The Tuareg community in Mali is beyond these people's grasp."

Historian Gregory Mann, a West Africa specialist at Columbia University, warned France it would be risky to ally with the MNLA, as Paris, eager to map an exit strategy, looks for partners to share the peacekeeping burden in Mali.

Legitimate concerns

"This idea of allying to some extent with the MNLA... might be somewhat short-sighted in so far as it's going to be extremely difficult for [Mali's] central government to negotiate with the MNLA," he said.

"There are legitimate concerns on both sides about recent war crimes and atrocities, and also about a long history of aggression."

But Mali, a country of 14 million people whose bow-tie-shaped map circumscribes a vast sprawl of territory and peoples, will have to address the grievances of its estimated 300 000 to 500 000 Tuareg to escape the current crisis.

Interim President Dioncounda Traore has offered the MNLA a place at the negotiating table in return for renouncing its demand for an independent state.

The MNLA may also be able to help negotiate the release of seven French hostages kidnapped in Mali and Niger by al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb in 2011 and 2012 who the Islamists are believed to be holding in the Kidal region, said Alain Antil of the French Institute of International Relations (IFRI).

"They are going to give advice, information, hoping to be at the negotiating table in the political process," he said.

"The MNLA obviously have a card to play."



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...