Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Somalia asks US to grant immunity to ex-PM

02 March 2013, 17:05

Virginia - Somalia's newly-recognised government is asking the state department to grant immunity to a former prime minister who was found responsible in a US court for human-rights abuses.

The letter issued this week by the Federal Republic of Somalia's prime minister, Abdi Farah Shirdon, seeks immunity for Muhammad Ali Samatar, who now lives in Fairfax but was a top official in dictator Siad Barre's regime in the 1980s and early 1990s.

Last year, a federal judge in Alexandria awarded seven Somali victims a $21m judgment against Samatar for orchestrating a campaign of torture and killings against members of the Isaaq clan.

Samatar fought the case for years, arguing that US courts had no right to pass judgment on internal Somali affairs.

On the eve of trial, he declared bankruptcy and entered a default judgment while continuing to pursue his immunity claim in an appeals court.

While he accepted legal liability for the killings, he denied wrongdoing.

At the time, Samatar was denied immunity in large part because there was no functioning government to claim immunity on his behalf.

After Barre's regime collapsed in 1991 the country lacked a true central government for more than 20 years. But in January, the US formally recognised the new Somali government.

Samatar's attorney, Joseph Peter Drennan, said he expects the US to honour Somalia's request and the case to be dismissed.

The 4th US Circuit of Appeals rejected an appeal filed by Samatar last year, but Drennan said on Friday he will file papers with the US Supreme Court on Monday to have the case tossed out.

"We fully expect the US will honour this request for immunity," Drennan said.

"To do otherwise would represent an affront to the government of Somalia."

State department press officers did not respond to questions about the case on Friday.

The fact that the Somali prime minister, who was himself an official in the Barre regime, requested the immunity so soon after receiving US recognition reflects the importance of the case to the Somali government, Drennan said.

He said the new government is seeking to move beyond the old score-settling of clan-based grievances, and lawsuits like the one brought in Virginia by members of the Isaaq clan "represent a threat to efforts to promote peace and reconciliation".

Kathy Roberts, a lawyer for the San Francisco-based Center for Justice and Accountability, said Somalia's immunity request for Samantar is disappointing.

"In his meeting with Secretary of State Clinton in January, [Somali] President [Hassan Sheikh Mohamud] made a commitment to restore faith in governance and the rule of law.

"Embracing impunity for war criminals is a disappointing beginning," she said in a statement.

The Somali prime minister's request for immunity for Samantar goes to the state department. If the state department decides to honour it, it would be up to a court to dismiss the case.

In rejecting Samatar's immunity claim last year, the appeals court said the executive branch's recommendation is a big factor in determining immunity, but not the only one.

It also said abuses such as torture and extrajudicial killings, like those Samatar was accused of, may never be eligible for protection.

The case against Samatar was initially filed in 2004 and has already been heard once by the US Supreme Court.

Initially the district court judge granted immunity to Samatar but the Supreme Court reinstated the case.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...