Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Sudan, South to resume border monitoring

20 March 2014, 06:40

Khartoum - Sudan and South Sudan agreed on Wednesday to reactivate a joint monitoring force along their contested border, a source said, as the southern government fights a rebellion.

The decision came during a meeting between South Sudan's defence minister Kuol Manyang Juuk and his Sudanese counterpart Abdelrahim Mohammed Hussein.

Juuk arrived in Khartoum on Tuesday for an official visit and was to present President Omar al-Bashir a letter from the South's leader Salva Kiir. Its message was not revealed.

"In two weeks' time they will reactivate" the UN-supported Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism as well as other forums for coordinating security between the countries, which fought border clashes in 2012, said the source who declined to be named but is familiar with the ministers' decision.

The mechanism was set up last year to monitor a buffer zone 10km on each side of a 1956 border line.

All activities of the monitoring unit were suspended after South Sudan's government decided in November to temporarily withdraw its monitors in a dispute over the buffer zone centreline, UN chief Ban Ki-moon said in a February report.

Peace agreement

Sudan and South Sudan disagree over certain parts of their border, which has not been demarcated.

Three weeks after the South pulled out of the mechanism, a clash between troops loyal to Kiir and those backing sacked vice president Riek Machar led to full-scale fighting in South Sudan.

Almost one million civilians have been displaced, including more than 40 000 who have arrived in Sudan, according to the United Nations.

Kiir's forces now control much of the South's Unity state but Upper Nile remains a "patchwork of zones of control", according to the Small Arms Survey, a Swiss-based independent research project.

Both states produce the oil which is vital to Khartoum and Juba.

The South separated in July 2011 under a peace agreement that ended a 1983-2005 civil war.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...