Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Tanzania sacks top wildlife officials

15 August 2012, 10:59

 Dar es Salaam - Tanzania has sacked the most senior official responsible for managing its wildlife and two others over the illegal export of more than 100 live animals and birds from the east African nation's game parks, local media reported on Tuesday.

In a case likely to damage Tanzania's reputation for looking after its exotic wildlife - a lucrative draw for tourists - Obeid Mbangwa, the director of wildlife, and two subordinates have been accused of involvement in the smuggling of animals to Qatar in a military plane in November 2010.

"They have already been served with letters of dismissal," state-run Daily News quoted the country's Natural Resources and Tourism Minister Hamisi Kagasheki as telling a news conference in Tanzania's political capital, Dodoma.

The minister, who was not available for comment later, said a criminal investigation was underway.

"The investigating team will travel to Qatar and ... question the pilots involved, ascertain the legality of permits used and physically see the animals that were smuggled out of the country," the minister said.

Tanzania's sweeping savanna plains in the shadow of Mount Kilimanjaro, Africa's highest peak, teem with wildlife, drawing tourists who pay hundreds of dollars a night to stay in luxury tented camps.

Its tourism sector earned $1.471bn in the year to June, making it the second biggest source of foreign currency after gold.

Members of parliament last year accused senior wildlife officials of smuggling giraffes, impalas, gazelles, hornbills, vultures and other rare wildlife out of the country.

More than 130 animals and birds were smuggled out of an airport in the north of the country where there are several national parks.

Like other countries across sub-Saharan Africa, Tanzania has seen a rise in poaching in recent years with criminals killing elephants and rhinos for their tusks which are used for ornaments and in some medicines, mostly in Asia.

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...