Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


UN attacks M23 with tanks, choppers

29 August 2013, 07:27

Kinshasa - United Nations helicopters fired on rebels fighting Congolese troops just outside a city of nearly 1 million people in eastern Congo on Wednesday, ratcheting up the UN's role in Congo's current conflict, officials said.

The fighting began just before 08:00 on Wednesday in the hills of the Kibati area, about 15km north of the provincial capital of Goma, according to both a government and a UN spokesperson. The rebels confirmed that they had been attacked by ground troops as well as from the air.

"There was a big offensive this morning. The government's army, helped by the United Nations attacked our positions near Goma with aircrafts, with combat tanks and with infantry," said the president of the M23 rebel movement, Bertrand Bisimwa, who spoke by telephone.

He said the UN's intervention brigade was on the frontline of the fighting: "It was the UN that was shooting directly at us, from their helicopters. It's the Tanzanian and South African [United Nations] troops that are on the frontline. It's them that we see first," he said.

The UN's intervention brigade was created as a result of intense international pressure after the rebels briefly held Goma late last year, and UN peacekeeping forces stood by because they were only authorised to protect civilians.

The UN Security Council approved the creation of the intervention brigade in March, giving the troops an expanded mandate allowing them to fight the M23 rebels.

In the weeks since the brigade has been deployed in eastern Congo, officials have given mixed messages about its role in the conflict, always stressing that the brigade was fighting "alongside" or "behind" Congolese army troops.

On Wednesday, officials reiterated that they were playing a support role. "The main engagement is by the [Congolese] forces," said Siphiwe Dlamini, a spokesperson for the South African military, which contributed South African troops to the brigade. "We are retaliating and going on the offensive."

Attack helicopters

Lt Col Felix Basse, the military spokesperson for the UN peacekeeping mission, known as Monusco, also said that UN forces were taking part in the fighting alongside the Congolese army Wednesday.

"Monusco has enlisted all of its attack helicopters and its artillery ... to push back the M23 offensive that is under way right now on the hills of Kibati," he told journalists in the capital of Kinshasa.

The UN mission has been utilizing its attack helicopters since 22 August in an effort to back the ground forces.

The M23 fighters launched their rebellion last year and peace talks with the Congolese government have repeatedly stalled.

Martin Kobler, the head of the UN peacekeeping mission, said the UN forces were doing their best to protect the city of Goma from rebel attacks.

"We can't guarantee the security of Goma's population but we can do all we can to improve security and prevent shells and other threats," he said.

The intervention brigade - consisting of Tanzanian, South African and Malawian soldiers - reinforces the 17 000 UN blue helmeted peacekeepers already in Congo. The peacekeepers can only protect civilians. The new intervention brigade, however, has a stronger mandate and is authorized to battle the rebel forces operating in mineral-rich eastern Congo.

The UN intervention brigade now in place promises to give the Congolese troops greater backing in their efforts to eliminate the rebel threat, though the new intervention brigade also stands to make UN forces more vulnerable to attack when they are seen as being on the offensive rather than a neutral force simply protecting civilians.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...