Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Ugandan cops abuse street kids – HRW

17 July 2014, 13:47

Johannesburg - Ugandan street children face constant abuse from police and government officials, who beat and extort bribes from them, Human Rights Watch said in a report on Thursday.

Police as well as Kampala city officials detain street children after targeted roundups, an HRW representative said.

 They beat them with batons, whips and wires as punishment for vagrancy or to extort bribes as a condition for letting them go, according to the 71-page report, titled, Where Do You Want Us To Go?

 Abuses Against Street Children in Uganda." Children have also been forced to clean police cells and living quarters.


The exact number of street children is not known. But more than half of Ugandans are under 15 years old.

Poverty has driven large numbers of children to live on the streets after their parents died of Aids or because they fled the rebellion of the Lord's Resistance Army in the north of the country.

 Homeless children are also beaten and forced to take drugs by older street children or adults, the report said. Boys and girls living on the street reported rape or other sexual assault.

 Police officers "take money from us. If you do not have money, they beat you so much", a 13-year-old boy living on the street in Lira in the north told HRW.

Living in fear

 "Last week ... police came in the night and beat me when I was sleeping with three other children. The policeman beat me on the thighs with a rubber whip.

 He then hit my knees with a baton. He beat me until I gave him 1 000 shillings (40c) and left me," the boy told HRW in December 2013.

 Maria Burnett, senior Africa researcher with the group, said: "Instead of being able to turn to the police or local government officials for help when they've been abused, children find themselves living in fear of the authorities meant to protect them."

HRW interviewed more than 130 current or former street children as well as organisations assisting them, health workers, police and government officials.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...