Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Wary US unlikely to restore full Egypt aid soon

07 June 2014, 15:22

Washington - As Egypt prepares to swear in its fourth leader since 2011, a huge slice of $1.5bn in US aid remains in deep-freeze amid fears the nation is sliding back into authoritarianism.

Former general Abdel Fattah al-Sisi will be crowned as the next president on Sunday after three years of political turmoil since the ousting of long-time iron-fisted leader Hosni Mubarak.

But far from welcoming Sisi as a step toward stability, some analysts are urging Washington to re-think its decades-old, military-based aid programme amid concerns over human rights abuses and a crackdown on civil liberties.

In a sign of Washington's unease, no senior US cabinet members will be attending the inauguration, with the state department's Thomas Shannon asked to lead the delegation.

US officials announced in April they planned to resume some military aid to Cairo, suspended late last year, including 10 Apache helicopters for counter-terrorism efforts in the Sinai peninsula.

But the aircraft remain in storage in the US, and a request to release about $650m of the frozen aid has been put on hold in Congress by Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy, chair of an appropriations subcommittee.

Leahy said he was "extremely disturbed" by Egypt's "flouting of human rights" and would not sign off on delivering the aid "until we have a better understanding of how the aid would be used".

But there are also no current plans to unblock the rest of the suspended 2014 funding, which includes some military hardware such as Harpoon missiles and parts for Abram tanks.

Under legislation penned by Leahy, Kerry has to certify Egypt is on the path to democracy before all the aid can be released.


"There's no timeline for when we have to make additional decisions about the assistance we haven't yet certified for Egypt," state department deputy spokesperson Marie Harf said, stressing there was "more work to do" and the administration was not "satisfied" about the pace of democratic progress.

While the US was ready to work with Egypt on badly-needed economic reforms, Harf was also non-committal on whether Washington would join a donors' conference proposed this week by Saudi Arabia.

The Gulf kingdom, together with the United Arab Emirates, has vowed to pump about $10bn  into the Egyptian economy.

West freaking out

Expert Michele Dunne argued the US should now "refocus its diplomacy on supporting the Egyptian people, while limiting relations with Sisi and his government to essential security interests".

The bulk of US aid should be transferred to a couple of major programmes providing direct assistance to the Egyptian people, instead of supporting contracts for US-made weapons for the already heavily-equipped army.

"A focus solely on co-operating with the state no longer makes sense in an era when the lifespan of Egyptian governments, at least the last three, has been measured more in months than in decades," said the expert with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

Using aid to try to force democratic reforms would also have little effect, with most Egyptians now deeply distrustful of America thanks to its muddled policies which have swung between support for Mubarak to tepid backing for Morsi and confusion over his ouster.

US moves to try to force a reconciliation the new leaders to reconcile with Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood will be seen "as us asking them to commit suicide", Eric Trager told a conference hosted by the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

A high-level Egyptian official defended his government against charges of pervasive abuses as well as suspicions over the polling.

The official, who asked not to be named, denounced what he called "this freaking out in the Western media" about the low turnout when the elections were extended unexpectedly for a third day.

"If anybody has this illusion of having superiority of teaching us which way we should go according to their own criteria, they are totally mistaken," he told a handful of reporters, speaking in English.

"We will do what we think is right, what the Egyptian people think is right," he said angrily.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...