Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Somalia khat ban angers growers, traders and users

08 September 2016, 12:39

Mogadishu - The rattle and honk of trucks carrying bales of the leafy narcotic khat have not been heard in Mogadishu since the government announced a surprise import ban this week.

Users, vendors and traders have been left bemused and angry by the unexplained government directive.

"You can't just say khat is banned without giving reasons or offering alternatives for people who depend on the trade," said Naciimo Abdiweli, a mother of five who sells the herbal stimulant at one of the many stalls dotted around the Somali capital.

Khat - also known as miraa - is a red-stemmed, green-leafed plant that has a mildly amphetamine-like effect when chewed, akin to one too many espressos.

Among Somalis it has long had social, cultural and religious uses but it is also frequently abused.

Traditionally, chewing was an afternoon activity for men, but increasingly they are also chewing in the morning, evening and throughout the night.

Addicts commonly spend all their money on bunches of leaves and waste hours in a stupor, green drool trickling from between brown-stained teeth. Doctors in Somalia have linked dependency to psychosis and paranoia.

No explanation

On Monday Somalia's government banned aeroplanes that are carrying khat from entering Somali airspace.

While it is enjoyed in Somalia, khat is grown in neighbouring Ethiopia and Kenya, both of which have large farming communities relying on its export for their livelihoods.

Contacted by AFP, Somalia's transport minister Ali Ahmed Jama Jangeli refused to give any reason for the ban. No explanation has been offered by any other government officials, leaving traders like Abdiweli at a loss.

"We've been told the government stopped flights bringing khat from Kenya and the market is empty now, but we don't know the reason," she said.

The Somali decision has upset Kenyan growers too.

"This is a big loss to us," said Dave Muthuri, chairman of the Kenya Miraa Farmers and Traders Association.

"Farmers are crying because of the loss they are incurring. It caught everyone off-guard," he added.

This week their crops - which must be transported fresh before the leaves wilt - have languished in sacks in Meru, where it is grown in Kenya's centre, and at the nation's Wilson Airport from where it is flown to Somalia.

Muthuri said no khat had left Kenya since Monday and that dozens of tonnes of the plant were going to waste. In Mogadishu, at the receiving end of the khat supply chain, business has ground to a halt.

"We are sitting on empty tables at markets waiting for news, but it seems the government does not want to talk to us openly about why they've stopped this business," said Ahmed Ugaas, a khat trader.

Ban can't last

But while some are concerned by the social damage done by khat, others believe it helps keep the volatile city calm.

"I believe that khat consumption played an important role in maintaining tranquillity," said Mohamed Abdisalam, a grocer.

"Most of the gunmen go and sit chewing every day from 11 in the morning, can you imagine what they will do when they don't have khat? They will go onto the streets and cause havoc!" he predicted.

Khat is banned in the US, Canada and most of Europe - all places with large diaspora Somali communities.

But no government or authority has ever succeeded in banning it in Somalia, not the military dictatorship, the warlords nor the Islamic extremists.

"It's a matter of days and then business will be back to normal", said Zakariye Mohamed, a regular khat consumer untroubled by the interruption in his supply.

"The military regime [of Siad Barre] was mightier than this government but they could not succeed in banning it. Even Al-Shabaab, who kill people, could not stop it," he said. "This thing is very tricky."



Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...