Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Abnormal birth weight may cause problems later in life

13 October 2015, 10:21

Birth weight and growth during childhood could affect hearing, vision, thinking and memory later in life, a new study suggests.

"Sensory problems and illness such as dementia are an increasing problem, but these findings suggest that issues begin to develop right from early life," said the study's leader, Dr Piers Dawes. He is a lecturer in audiology at the University of Manchester's School of Psychological Sciences in England.

No need for panic

"While interventions in adulthood may only have a small effect, concentrating on making small improvements to birth size and child development could have a much greater impact on numbers of people with hearing, vision and cognitive mental impairment," Dawes said in a university news release.

However, the study findings don't mean that parents of children who don't physically match their average-sized peers at birth or as they're growing throughout childhood should panic. The study was only designed to find an association between these factors; it cannot show a cause-and-effect relationship.

The researchers looked at data from more than 430,000 adults, aged 40 to 69, in the United Kingdom.

After considering other factors, such as health and smoking, the researchers concluded that children who were too small or too large at birth had worse hearing, vision, and thinking and memory skills by the time they reached middle-age.

Meanwhile, babies born within the 10th and 90th percentile for weight had better hearing, sight, and mental skills when they were adults, the study reported.

In addition, better childhood growth was associated with better hearing, vision, and thinking and memory skills later in life, according to the study published recently in PLOS One.

The study authors suspect that poor nutrition during childhood may have a negative effect on the brain and the senses. They theorised that early influences on growth hormones and genetic regulation might affect long-term neurosensory development.

- Health24

Tags health

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...