Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Daily aspirin may curb cancer

13 August 2012, 11:55

  A new study bolsters the case that daily aspirin may help protect against cancer, although the effect seems weaker than previously thought.

Like earlier research, the new work has considerable limitations.

"News about the cancer potential of aspirin use has been really encouraging lately," said Dr Michael Thun of the American Cancer Society, who worked on the study. "Things are moving forward, but it is still a work in progress."

Aspirin and cancer

Medical guidelines in the US already urge people to take low doses of aspirin to prevent heart disease if the predicted benefits outweigh the risk of side effects, or if they have already suffered a heart attack.

Whether those recommendations should be broadened to include cancer prevention is still up in the air, however.

Earlier this year, an analysis of previous clinical trials showed that people on aspirin were less likely to die of cancer than those not on the medication, with a 37% drop in cancer deaths observed from five years onwards.

How the study was done

The new report, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, is based on a decade's worth of data from more than 100 000 men and women in the US, most over 60 and all of them non-smokers.

People who said they took daily aspirin - whether low-dose or regular strength - had a 16% lower risk of dying from cancer than non-users overall, Dr Thun and his colleagues found.

For men, the difference came out to 103 fewer cancer deaths a year per 100 000 people; for women, the number was 42.

The effect was strongest for gastrointestinal cancers. But it didn't seem to matter whether people had been on aspirin for more or less than five years.

Because the study wasn't a clinical trial, it's hard to know if the findings can be attributed to aspirin or if something else is at play.

Still, Dr Thun said the results would favour broadening the aspirin guidelines to include cancer prevention based on an individual risk-benefit assessment. But he added that it will take scientists a few years to mull over all of the existing evidence. Other researchers are more sceptical. Dr Kausik Ray of St. George's University of London, who has studied aspirin, said the new study did not look at overall death rates or side effects such as serious stomach bleeds.

"This is not a drug without side effects, so what you have to look at is net benefit," he said.

Detection bias

Earlier this year, Dr Ray's team published an analysis of previous aspirin trials showing the medication did not prevent deaths from heart disease or cancer, and was likely to cause more harm than good.

One of the problems with the new study as well as with previous aspirin trials, he said, is detection bias. Patients who develop GI bleeding from aspirin are likely to get worked up by a doctor. As a result, doctors may find and remove tumours or precancerous polyps, which could prolong the patient's life.

So far, most aspirin trials have been designed to test the drug's effect on heart disease. Dr Ray called for trials that specifically check people for new cancers at given intervals to weed out the selection bias marring the previous research.

"I don't think we have enough hard evidence suggesting everybody should be taking" aspirin, Dr Ray said.

The government-backed U.S. Preventive Services Task Force agrees. It discourages the use of aspirin to prevent colorectal cancer in people at average risk for the disease.

- Reuters Health

Tags cancer

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...