Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Diabetics should pay attention to heart risks

09 March 2015, 15:14

Even if they haven't been diagnosed with heart disease, diabetics with classical heart-risk factors like smoking and elevated "bad" cholesterol are at heightened risk of serious heart-related "events" and death, according to a new study.

Among people with diabetes but not heart disease, researchers linked more than a third of cardiovascular "events" - such as heart attack and stroke - and 7 percent of deaths to inadequate control of heart risk factors.

That means those cardiac events and deaths might have been avoided with better control of the known risk factors, the study team writes in Diabetes Care.

"The take home message from this study is that adults with diabetes can reduce their risk of cardiovascular events, and patients should work together with their provider to set a care plan including goals and strategies to reduce modifiable risk factors," said lead author Gabriela Vazquez-Benitez, a research investigator at HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

"This can include regular care visits, screening, laboratory, weight, and blood pressure," she told Reuter's Health in an email.

Read: Diabetes and the heart

Risk factors for cardiovascular problems in diabetics

The risk factors for cardiovascular problems in diabetes are well known and include high blood pressure, smoking and poor control of blood sugar. If more attention were paid to these risk factors, the rate of cardiovascular problems and death could be substantially reduced, the study team argues.

There are nearly 25 million Americans with diabetes and if current trends continue, more than one in three adults are projected to develop the disease.

Stroke and coronary heart disease are the major causes of complications, deaths and healthcare costs in adults with diabetes, they write.

The authors point out that medical advances have improved the health of people with diabetes, especially when it comes to cardiovascular problems. But for people with diabetes as a group, the burden of cardiovascular problems remains very high.

In their study, Vaquez-Benitez and her team analysed data on nearly 860,000 adults with diabetes.

They looked at rates of major cardiovascular complications such as heart attacks and heart failure, as well as deaths from all causes, plus four risk factors: blood pressure, levels of LDL cholesterol, smoking and blood sugar levels over the months.

The authors emphasise that overall rates of major cardiovascular complications and deaths were "substantially higher" in people with diabetes who already had heart disease, compared to those without it.

But delaying diabetes complications is possible, Vazquez-Benitez said, not only for cardiovascular events but for problems like nerve damage and kidney disease.

"Although there is a genetic component of diabetes, there are modifiable risk factors that can reduce risk of heart attack, stroke and death," said Deborah Greenwood, a registered nurse and president of the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Lowering blood sugar, LDL cholesterol and blood pressure, as well as quitting smoking can greatly reduce risk, she said.

All adults over 45 should be screened for diabetes so it can be diagnosed and treated early, said Greenwood, who was not involved in the study. For most people with so-called pre-diabetes, she pointed out, losing 5 to 7 percent of body weight and doing 150 minutes of physical activity per week could avert progression to full-blown diabetes.

She also emphasized the importance of participating in diabetes self-management education and partnering with a diabetes educator to change behaviours and improve modifiable risk factors. "A diabetes educator will work with you to develop a plan specifically tailored to your individual needs, preferences and lifestyle to ensure success," Greenwood said.

- Reuters


Intersex explained

26 October 2016, 08:38

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...