Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Feeling depressed? Here is some advice

02 February 2015, 11:15

Women who averaged 150 minutes of moderate exercise (golf, tennis, aerobics classes, swimming or line-dancing) or 200 minutes of walking every week had more energy, socialized more, felt better emotionally and weren't as limited by their depression when researchers followed up after three years.

They also had less pain and did better physically, although the psychological benefit was greater.

With depression so prevalent, "there is an urgent need" to identify treatments, including non-medical options that people can do themselves, said Kristiann Heesch, who led the study.

Heesch, senior lecturer at Queensland University of Technology, and her colleagues point out in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (January 13, 2015) that depression is expected to be the second-leading cause of global disease by 2030 and the leading cause in high-income countries.

One in 10 U.S. adults suffers from depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Women are 70 percent more likely to be depressed at some point in their lives than men, according to the National Institute of Mental Health.

In addition, previous research at Queensland University, Heesch found that exercise and walking could boost physical and emotional health in women who are not depressed.

In fact, Heesch said in an email, physical activity may have an even greater effect on psychological health-related quality of life in women in their 50s and 60s who are depressed.

Her team analyzed data on 1,904 women born in 1946-1951 who answered questions about their exercise habits, physical health and mental health in 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010. In 2001, all of them had reported at least 10 depressive symptoms, indicating mild to moderate depression.

But over time, their physical health, mental health, pain, physical functioning, vitality and social functioning all improved when they did 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity or 200 minutes of walking in an average week.

More exercise was linked to greater improvements, but even low amounts of exercise had benefits.

"The good news is that while the most benefits require 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity physical activity or 200 minutes of walking, even smaller amounts . . . can improve well-being," Heesch said.

Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, who holds the Betty Jo Hay Distinguished Chair in Mental Health at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said the study had some major strengths, including its large number of women, their physical and psychological improvements over time and the estimate of how much exercise was needed to improve quality of life.

Trivedi, who was not involved in the study, also noted that it focused on women at "the very age where risks (for depression) are high."

"It does improve quality of life. That is not a new finding but there remains skepticism in the culture that walking really does anything for depression or vitality - and this shows that it does," said Trivedi.

He noted that the benefits in the study were much stronger in the immediate future than in the long run, and that being consistently and vigorously active proved most beneficial.

These days, "more and more of these larger prospective studies are beginning to show that people with depression benefit from this," he said.

But, Trivedi noted, more research should be done on how much exercise is needed to lift depression. He said research could become more objective by using new technology, such as iPhones, to monitor physical activity instead of relying on self-reports.

"My speculation is that those women who did not see the benefit probably stopped or reduced their activity . . . it may be those are the women who need a more vigorous exercise to benefit," Trivedi said.

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...