Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Goodbye to reading glasses?

21 October 2014, 13:22

Abuja - A new implantable eye device might make reading glasses a thing of the past, researchers report.

Ring inserted into the cornea

Many people over age 40 develop blurriness in their near vision (presbyopia), which makes it difficult to see up close. The condition affects more than 1 billion people worldwide.

New products designed to treat the condition include a thin ring inserted into the cornea of the eye that adjusts the depth of field to enable a person with presbyopia to see near and far. The KAMRA device can be implanted in about 10 minutes with only topical anesthesia, its developers say.

The device was tested in more than 500 patients, aged 45 to 60, with presbyopia who were not nearsighted. Three years of follow-up showed that the device enabled 83 percent of the patients to see with 20/40 vision.

This meant they could read a newspaper or drive a vehicle without corrective lenses, according to the study released Saturday at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Ophthalmology in Chicago.

If complications occur, the device can be removed, making it a reversible treatment. That's not the case for some other treatments for presbyopia, the researchers noted.

"This is a solution that truly delivers near vision that transitions smoothly to far distance vision," study author Dr. John Vukich, a clinical adjunct professor in ophthalmology and vision sciences at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, said in an academy news release.

"Corneal inlays represent a great opportunity to improve vision with a safety net of removability," he added.

KAMRA is available in Asia, Europe and South America, but has not yet been approved in the United States. Two other types of corneal inlays are also being developed for the U.S. market.

The data and conclusions of research presented at meetings are typically considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

- Health24

For the latest on national news, politics, sport, entertainment and more follow us on Twitter and like our Facebook page.


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...