Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Guidelines to treat aggressive breast cancer

08 May 2014, 09:51

Abuja - Two sets of guidelines for treating patients with an aggressive form of breast cancer have been released by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

According to ASCO, about 15% to 20% of breast cancers are known as "HER2-positive", meaning that they carry high levels of the HER2 protein, which causes tumour cells to grow and divide faster than happens with most other breast cancers. This means that HER2-positive cases are especially aggressive and tough to treat.

However, doctors now "have several treatments for advanced HER2-positive breast cancer, all of which are associated with improved survival," Dr Eric Winer, co-chair of the expert panel that developed the guidelines, said in an ASCO news release. "We're very fortunate that now we have multiple studies that give us a clear picture of how these newer agents should be used."

Second and third-line therapies

In the first guideline, the group recommends treatments for women newly diagnosed with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer and those with early stage breast cancer that has progressed to an advanced stage.

After examining 19 studies, Winer and his colleagues on the panel advised a combination of standard chemotherapy plus two other drugs, trastuzumab and pertuzumab, as first-line treatment. For certain patients – such as those with contraindications and/or slow-growing hormone receptor-positive cancers – chemotherapy-based treatment may be replaced with hormonal therapy given with or without either trastuzumab or lapatinib, the panelists said.

Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is recommended as a second-line therapy if the first line of treatment fails, the guideline says.

For third-line therapy and beyond, treatment depends on a patient's previous breast cancer treatments. Options include T-DM1, hormonal therapy or chemotherapy with trastuzumab and in some cases with lapatinib, the combination of trastuzumab and lapatinib, or a pertuzumab-based regimen if the patient did not previously receive pertuzumab.

The second set of guidelines outlines treatments for treating cancer that has spread (metastasized) to the brain in women with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer.

Surgery and/or radiation therapy are recommended for patients with a good chance of survival, depending on the size and number of brain tumours, chances of surgical success and symptoms.

Neurologic function and quality of life

Treatment options for patients with a low chance of survival include surgery, whole brain radiation therapy and certain drugs that may prove effective, such as lapatinib and capecitabine.

Other options for these patients include taking part in a clinical trial, supportive care and/or palliative care.

Brain metastases occur in 30 to 40% of women with HER2-positive breast cancer. These patients can live two years or more after being diagnosed with brain metastases. This is the first guideline specifically for such patients.

"Brain metastases can compromise neurologic function, and treatments are designed to preserve neurologic function and minimise the decline in quality of life," Dr Sharon Giordano, co-chair of the panel that developed the guideline, said in the news release.

"But at the same time, some of the treatments for brain metastases have side effects that can negatively affect cognitive function. We hope that this guideline will help standardise care for these patients and balance toxicities and benefits of treatment."

Both guidelines were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

- Health24

For the latest on national news, politics, sport, entertainment and more follow us on Twitter and like our Facebook page!


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...