Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Here's how to not pick up that unwanted weight as you grow older

24 June 2015, 12:07

While men and women who ate lots of nuts, peanut butter, fish, yogurt and low-fat cheese tended to lose weight, other foods commonly seen as "unhealthy" -  such as eggs, full-fat cheese and whole milk -  did not seem to make a difference in weight.

On the other hand, sugary drinks and refined or starchy carbohydrates - including white bread, potatoes and white rice - had the opposite effect.

"The idea that the human body is just a bucket for calories is too simplistic. It's not just a matter of thinking about calories, or fat.

What's the quality of the foods we are eating? And how do we define quality?" said senior researcher Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, of Tufts University and the Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston USA.

In general, the researchers reported, adults gained more weight as the "glycemic load" in their diets rose.

Glycemic load measures both the amount of carbohydrates in the diet, and the quality of those carbohydrates, said Mozaffarian.

A white-flour bagel, for instance, has a glycemic load (GL) of about 25 units, he noted; in contrast, a serving of quinoa - a whole grain - has a GL of around 13 units, and a serving of chickpeas has a GL of only 3.

In this study, every 50-unit increase in a person's daily glycemic load - the equivalent of two bagels - was tied to an extra pound gained over four years.

What's more, certain foods - like eggs and cheese- were connected to weight gain only if people also boosted their intake of refined or starchy carbs.

Red and processed meats, meanwhile, were also tied to weight gain. Again, though, some of the harm was reduced if a person's glycemic load was kept in check.

So, Mozaffarian said, eating that burger with a salad, rather than fries, could be a smarter move. Better yet, he added, eat it without the bun.

The findings, reported online in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, are based on 24 years of diet information from nearly 121,000 U.S. health professionals. At the outset, all were healthy and normal-weight, on average.

Over time, the study found, people's weight crept up - as it tends to with age - but the odds differed depending on the typical quality of their protein and carbs. That was the case even when the researchers accounted for other lifestyle factors, including overall calorie intake.

To Mozaffarian, that means counting calories is not enough to maintain a healthy weight in the long run.

Dietary fat was once demonized, Mozaffarian said, and that only led to people eating more refined carbs. "A lot of people still think you need to avoid fat to lose weight," he said.

Now, Mozaffarian worries that "count calories" is the new "low fat."

Putting calorie counts on menus, he said, could send consumers the wrong message: If that deli sandwich has a relatively low calorie count, people may assume it's a good choice - even if it's mainly processed meat and refined carbs.

The quality of protein, carbs and fat is vital

"This study really brings that to light," said Lauri Wright, an assistant professor of community and family health at the University of South Florida, in Tampa.

"But I don't want people to think calories don't matter," Wright stressed.

There are also no "magic bullet" foods that will melt off the pounds, she said. Nor can people avoid weight gain, and stay healthy, simply by avoiding a few "bad" foods.

Instead, Wright advised, choose healthy carbs, including vegetables, fruits and fiber-rich grains; proteins like fish, chicken and nuts; and "good" fats such as those in vegetable oils and fatty fish.

"You could have chicken breast on whole-grain bread, plus a salad, for lunch," she said. "For a snack, have almonds, or hummus and vegetables. Then for dinner, have salmon and vegetables."

But, she added, "calorie balance" - including the calories burned through exercise - is still important.

- Health24

Tags diet health

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...