Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


High debt may have negative health consequences

08 July 2014, 09:45

Abuja - If young people are drowning in debt, their blood pressure may be on the rise and their health could suffer. A new Northwestern Medicine® study has found that high financial debt is associated with higher diastolic blood pressure and poorer self-reported general and mental health in young adults.

The study, published in the August issue of Social Science and Medicine, offers a glimpse into the impact debt may have on the health of young Americans.

“We now live in a debt-fuelled economy,” said Elizabeth Sweet, lead author of the study. “Since the 1980s American household debt has tripled. It’s important to understand the health consequences associated with debt.”

Sweet is an assistant professor of medical social sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a faculty associate of Cells to Society (C2S): The Center on Social Disparities and Health, at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern.

Researchers used data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to explore the association between debt and both psychological and general health outcomes in 8 400 young adults, ages 24 to 32.

Previous studies have found evidence that debt is associated with adverse psychological health, but this is the first to look at physical health as well.

Here are some key findings of the study:

• 20% of participants reported that they would still be in debt if they liquidated all of their assets (high debt-to-asset-ratio).

• Higher debt-to-asset ratio was associated with higher perceived stress and depression, worse self-reported general health and higher diastolic blood pressure.

Those with higher debt were found to have a 1.3% increase (relative to the mean) in diastolic blood pressure, which is clinically significant. A two-point increase in diastolic blood pressure, for example, is associated with a 17% higher risk of hypertension and a 15% higher risk of stroke.

The researchers found that individuals with high compared to low debt reported higher levels of perceived stress (representing an 11.7% increase relative to the mean) and higher depressive symptoms (a 13.2% increase relative to the mean).

“You wouldn’t necessarily expect to see associations between debt and physical health in people who are so young,” Sweet said. “We need to be aware of this association and understand it better. Our study is just a first peek at how debt may impact physical health.”

Debt-to-asset ratio

In the study, personal financial debt was measured in two ways. Participants were asked about their debt-to-asset ratio by answering this question: “Suppose you and others in your household were to sell all of your major possessions (including your home), turn all of your investments and other assets into cash, and pay off all of your debts. Would you have something left over, break even or be in debt?”

Second, participants were asked how much debt, besides a home mortgage, they have. Response categories ranged from “less than R9 970.00” to “R249 255.00 or more".

Perceived stress, depressive symptoms and general health were measured through a series of questions. Both systolic and diastolic blood pressures were measured on each participant by a field interviewer.

Other study authors include Thomas W. McDade, professor of anthropology at Northwestern and director of C2S: The Center on Social Disparities and Health, at the Institute for Policy Research, Emma K.

Adam, professor of human development and social policy at C2S and in the school of education and social policy at Northwestern, and Arijit Nandi, assistant professor at the Institute for Health and Social Policy and the department of epidemiology, biostatistics and occupational health at McGill University.

Support for the analyses presented in this paper was provided by grant #1R01 HD053731-01 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...