Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Menstrual cycle can influence efforts to stop smoking

09 January 2015, 11:17

Women who want to quit smoking need every advantage they can get. Now, a new study finds that timing a quit attempt around certain points in the menstrual cycle may increase the chances of success.

Women have a tougher time

According to background information from the study, only about one in 10 smokers who quit are still smoke-free after a year, and women have a tougher time quitting than men, even if they smoke the same amount as men.

In the new study, Canadian researchers tracked outcomes for 34 men and women who smoked more than 15 cigarettes a day. They found that the women's craving for nicotine was strongest during their periods.

Also Read: E-cigarette use triples among high school kids

That may be because declines in levels of the hormones oestrogen and progesterone boost nicotine withdrawal symptoms and also boost the activity of brain circuits associated with craving, the researchers said.

The results suggest that women who want to quit smoking may have a better chance of success if they try to kick the habit after they ovulate, when their levels of oestrogen and progesterone are elevated, according to study lead author Adrianna Mendrek of the University of Montreal.

Sex hormones might play a role

"Taking the menstrual cycle into consideration could help women to stop smoking," she said in a university news release.

The study was published recently in Psychiatry Journal.

According to the study authors, prior research found that female rats became addicted to nicotine and other substances more quickly, and worked harder for the same dose, compared to male rats. This suggests that sex hormones might play a role in addiction, Mendrek's team said.

However, each smoker is unique in terms of tobacco use, personality, personal history, social situation and environment, Mendrek added.

"Stress, anxiety and depression are probably the more important factors to take into consideration," she noted.

- Health24


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...