Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Moms don’t know why babies are hospitalised

13 June 2013, 07:36

Mothers in low-income countries may not understand why their babies are hospitalised after delivery, putting sick newborns at higher risk of health problems and death after being released from the hospital, a new study shows.

Forty percent of participating mothers in Ghana with sick infants had no understanding of why their child was in the hospital and another 28% had only partial understanding, according to the University of Michigan Health System study that appears in Paediatrics and International Child Health Journal. One-third of the women also reported blaming themselves for the child's illness.

"Sick newborns in low-income countries are at very high risk of adverse health outcomes," says lead author Katherine J. Gold, M.D., M.S.W., M.S., assistant professor of family medicine and of obstetrics and gynaecology at the U-M Medical School.

Parents don’t understand health issues

"Mothers who lack a clear understanding of why their infant is in the hospital might have difficulty communicating preferences about care, understanding the type of care needed, and recognising future warning signs of illness. This lack of understanding could put their baby at high risk."

Research shows that parents in low income countries often fail to recognise and seek treatment for 'red-flag' warning signs of serious illness in newborns, such as poor feeding, dehydration, lethargy, and jaundice.

Parents who don't understand their child's health issues after delivery – which may range from low birth weight to a serious infection – may have an especially difficult time recognising symptoms the baby needs treatment once families are home.

Communication gap

Authors point to factors that may contribute to the communication gap between mothers and physicians or nurses, including heavy patient volumes, very sick patients, and inadequate numbers of trained health care providers in hospitals in low-income countries. Ghana's doctor-to-patient ratio is about 1 to 10,000, compared to a ratio of 24 to 10,000 in the United States.

The workload and severity of illnesses may minimize the time physicians and nurses can spend communicating with and educating parents of hospitalized infants. Parents may not have enough education to know what to ask and in some countries, parent may feel uncomfortable asking questions directly to physicians.

"Such a setting is ripe for misunderstandings and confusion and may prevent parents from learning what to watch for when their baby goes home," Gold says.

"We need to do more work to understand the barriers of educating parents about their baby's illness to avoid preventable health problems and reduce the risk of mortality among newborns."

- EurekAlert


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...