Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Night owls run higher risk of health problems

10 April 2015, 12:34

Night owls are more likely than early risers to develop diabetes and other health problems, even if they get the same amount of sleep.

1 600 people's sleeping habits

That's the conclusion of a new study that included more than 1,600 people in South Korea, aged 47 to 59, who provided information about their sleep habits and underwent tests to assess their health.

"Regardless of lifestyle, people who stayed up late faced a higher risk of developing health problems like diabetes or reduced muscle mass than those who were early risers," Dr. Nan Hee Kim, of Korea University College of Medicine in Ansan, South Korea, said in a news release from the Endocrine Society.

"This could be caused by night owls' tendency to have poorer sleep quality and to engage in unhealthy behaviours like smoking, late-night eating and a sedentary lifestyle," Kim added.

Of the 1,600 people in the study, 95 were night owls, 480 were early risers and the remainder fell somewhere in the middle.

Night owls have higher levels of body fat

Even though they tended to be younger, night owls had higher levels of body fat and fats in the blood than early risers. Night owls were also more likely to have sarcopenia, a condition where the body gradually loses muscle mass, the findings showed.

Men who were night owls were more likely to have diabetes or sarcopenia than those who were early risers, the investigators found.

Compared to women who were early risers, women who were night owls tended to have more belly fat and a higher risk of metabolic syndrome – a collection of health conditions that increase the risk of diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The study was published online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Issue needs to be addressed

Considering that many younger people are night owls, the risk associated with this type of sleep habit is "an important health issue that needs to be addressed," Kim said.

The study found an association between being a night owl and increased health risks; it did not prove cause-and-effect.

- Health24


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...