Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Poor sperm quality could indicate high blood pressure

11 December 2014, 10:05

Defects in sperm within semen may be linked to a variety of health problems, including high blood pressure, heart disease, and skin and glandular disorders, a new study suggests.

The defects probably don't cause these problems. It's more likely that semen quality reflects overall health, the researchers said.

"It may be that infertility is a marker for sickness overall," said lead researcher Dr. Michael Eisenberg, an assistant professor of urology and director of male reproductive medicine and surgery at the Stanford School of Medicine in Palo Alto, Calif.

Semen is the fluid that's released when a man ejaculates. Within that fluid are sperm. Sperm defects can affect the quality of semen. Sperm defects include too few sperm, sperm that don't move well (motility) or low-quality sperm, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM).

"There are a lot of factors that involve a man's overall health that turn out to impair sperm production," Eisenberg said.

Read: Is coffee giving you high blood pressure?

Genetics play a part in sperm production

Treating conditions such as high blood pressure might improve sperm quality, he noted. However, Eisenberg said he isn't sure whether the condition itself is linked to sperm defects or if drugs used to treat health problems are to blame.

"Many things we didn't know about or think about may impact a man's fertility," he said. "It might be treatment for high blood pressure that is causing sperm problems."

Genetics may also play a part, Eisenberg suggested. "About 10 percent of the genes in a man's body are involved in sperm production, so it is possible that some of these genes may have overlapping effects on other functions," he said.

In the study published online Dec. 10 in the journal Fertility and Sterility, Eisenberg's group compared the health of men who had semen defects with men who didn't.

The researchers found that 44 percent of men with semen defects also had other health problems. These included high blood pressure, and heart and blood vessel disease.

In addition, as the number of other health conditions - such as skin disease or glandular problems - increased, so too did the likelihood of semen issues, according to the study.

For the study, the researchers analysed medical records of more than 9,000 men who were seen between 1994 and 2011 for infertility, according to the report. The men were mostly between 30 and 50 years old.

The men's semen was assessed for amount, sperm count and activity. In about half of the men, a fertility problem was due to abnormal semen, the researchers said.

Read: Too much booze may harm your sperm

Importance of a healthy lifestyle

"This is another piece of evidence of how important not only fertility is, but overall health. There is a lot of overlap. Regardless of what your goals are, whether it's to live forever or have a baby, it's important to take care of yourself," Eisenberg said.

Dr. Tomer Singer, a reproductive endocrinologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, said, "This study confirms what reproductive endocrinologists have been detecting - that there is a correlation between medical conditions and semen production."

This study can help fertility specialists understand the complex relationship between semen production and medical problems, Singer added.

"The result of this study will allow us to help our patients lead healthier lifestyles, consume less medication, which can also affect sperm quality, and increase the chance of normal sperm production," he said.

Lifestyle modification, including regular exercise and avoiding smoking and alcohol, can help prevent many medical conditions, Singer suggested, which may help improve sperm quality and the chances of conception.

- Health24


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...