Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Public seeks health info when famous people die

25 April 2014, 11:03

Abuja - The deaths of well-known people offer an opportunity to educate the general public about disease detection and prevention, a new study suggests.

Researchers surveyed 1 400 American men and women after Apple co-founder Steve Jobs died of pancreatic cancer in 2011 and learned that more than one-third of them sought information about his cause of death or information about cancer in general soon after his death was reported.

About 7% of the respondents said they looked specifically for information about pancreatic cancer. That may seem low, but applied to the US population as a whole it would work out to more than 2 million people, the Indiana University team said.

Large racial disparities

"In the medical community, there has been a big push to try to educate the public about the nuances of cancer," lead author Jessica Gall Myrick, an assistant professor in the university's school of journalism, said in a university news release.

Cancer is "not just one disease; it's a lot of different diseases that happen to share the same label," she explained. "Celebrity announcements or deaths related to cancer are a rare opportunity for public health advocates to explain the differences between cancers, and how to prevent or detect them, to a public that is otherwise not paying much attention to these details."

The study authors were surprised to discover that racial minorities and people with lower levels of education were more likely to identify with Jobs and to seek information about pancreatic cancer after his death.

"Because there are large racial disparities in the incidence of many cancers, much focus is on such populations. Unfortunately, the population of individuals who may need cancer education the most often seek out cancer information the least – especially particular low-income and racial minority populations for whom cancer is more prevalent," the researchers wrote.

Educating the public

"This makes our results fairly surprising, and it suggests that in certain contexts, cancer prevention, detection and communication efforts directed toward disparity populations may find an approach that uses relevant public figures and celebrities as useful," the study authors concluded.

More than 50% of the study participants learned about Jobs' death through the internet or social media, which suggests that health educators could use these avenues to provide accurate information about diseases, the researchers said.

They added that reports in popular media about the health problems of famous people offer opportunities to inform the public about disease risk and prevention.

"More people will see a story about Steve Jobs' or Patrick Swayze's battles with pancreatic cancer in People magazine than will read a long, scientific piece on the disease in the New York Times," Gall Myrick said. "Health communicators need to act quickly to educate the public when interest and motivation are at their peak so that more lives can be saved."

The study was published online in the Journal of Health Communication.

- Health24

For the latest on national news, politics, sport, entertainment and more follow us on Twitter and like our Facebook page!


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...