Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Violent past leads to risky sex

10 May 2012, 12:55

Women who have experienced multiple forms of violence, from witnessing neighbourhood crimes to being abused themselves, are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviour, according to a new report in the Psychology of Violence.

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital's Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine say certain patterns of violence in both childhood and adulthood may make a woman more likely to take significant sexual risks, such as having unprotected sex or a high number of sexual partners.

The findings offer new insight on the known link between exposure to violence and HIV/STD risk behaviour, particularly among low-income, urban women, who may experience high rates of violence.

What the study showed

"Sadly, our results show that many women must cope with multiple forms of violence, and that some combinations of violent experiences put women at risk for HIV, other STDs or unplanned pregnancy – not to mention the risks from the violence itself," said lead author Jennifer Walsh, Ph.D., of The Miriam Hospital's Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine.

Although previous research has linked sexual risk behaviour and diverse forms of violence – including childhood maltreatment and sexual abuse, intimate partner violence and exposure to community violence – very few studies have considered patterns of violence and their impact on sexual risk-taking, even though some women experience multiple types of violence.

Rate of violence

The current study included 481 women attending an urban STD clinic who were assessed for previous history of violence and current sexual risk-taking behaviours. The women were primarily African American and most were socioeconomically disadvantaged.

Overall, women reported high rates of exposure to violence compared to the general population. All types of violence were interrelated, with women who experienced one type of violence being more likely to experience other forms as well.

Using a statistical technique known as latent class analysis to find common patterns in the data, researchers identified four classes of women with different experiences of violence: women with low exposure to violence (39%) women who were predominantly exposed to community violence (20%); women who were predominantly exposed to childhood maltreatment (23%); and women who experienced multiple forms of violence (18%).

The team found women who reported experiencing multiple forms of violence and those who were exposed to community violence had the highest levels of sexual risk behaviour, including lifetime number of sexual partners and alcohol and drug use before sex.

What the findings mean

Walsh believes the study has several clinical implications. "Given the ties between multiple violent experiences and sexual risk-taking, clinicians working with women who experience violence or who are at risk for HIV/STDs may need to consider the overlap between the two in order to impact sexual health consequences," she said.

She adds, "The clustering of different types of violence suggests clinicians who work with women who have experienced one type of violence should inquire about other types of violence in order to get a complete picture."

Multiple violence experiences

With the understanding that multiple violence experiences are common for women with the highest sexual risk, Walsh also suggests interventionists working to reduce HIV risk may want to provide women with resources for coping with intimate partner and community violence, or for overcoming childhood maltreatment or abuse.

Similarly, those working with women experiencing intimate partner violence or other forms of violence may want to address strategies for safer sex.

"These findings also highlight how social and community context influence individuals in complex ways, how social and health problems often cluster, and the need to broaden risk reduction program to include couples as well as focusing on individuals," notes Michael Carey, Ph.D., director of The Miriam Hospital's Centers for Behavioral and Preventive Medicine and a co-investigator on the study.

Either way, the authors say further research is needed to better understand how and why violent experiences are associated with sexual risk behaviour in order to develop more effective interventions.

Walsh says that the research is especially timely, coming on the heels of a recent Presidential memorandum establishing a working group known as "Intersection of HIV/AIDS, Violence Against Women and Girls, and Gender-related Health Disparities.

“The working group aims to address both the rising incidence of HIV among women and girls as well as the increasing rates of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Source: Health24


Things a woman shouldn't do after 25

27 October 2016, 12:05

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...