Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


African allies aim to pin down Boko Haram

19 February 2015, 18:41

Lagos - Niger, Chad and Cameroon are seeking to pin down Boko Haram within Nigeria's borders ahead of a ground-and-air offensive by a regional task-force due to start from the end of next month, a senior Niger military official told Reuters.

The Islamist group, which has killed thousands of people in a six-year insurgency in Nigeria, has fought fierce battles with the three countries' armies in southern Niger and northern Cameroon, near Nigeria's borders, in recent weeks.

Also read: Nigerian warplanes bomb Boko Haram forest training camps

Chadian forces have made incursions into Nigeria to push back the jihadist fighters, hundreds of whom have been killed.

Military chiefs will meet in the Chadian capital N'Djamena next week to finalise strategy for the 8,700-strong task-force of troops from Chad, Cameroon, Nigeria, Benin and Niger, said Colonel Mahamane Laminou Sani, director of documentation and military intelligence of Niger's armed forces.

"All we are doing right now is stopping Boko Haram from entering Niger: if they attack our positions we push them back a certain distance and Nigeria pushes from the other side to contain the situation," he said, on the sidelines of the annual U.S.-sponsored 'Flintlock' counter-terrorism exercises in Chad.

"There are initiatives by our countries to make sure Boko Haram doesn't get out of control, but we have a deadline of end-March to put the joint force into practice," he told Reuters late on Wednesday.

Highlighting the cross-border threat, militants attacked Niger overnight, killing three before they were driven back.

The force's first commander will be a Nigerian and the position will then rotate annually among members, Sani said.

The implementation of the force has been delayed by tensions between Nigeria and Cameroon over the right to pursue militants across the border into each other's countries, sources said.

Niger and Chad already have agreements in place covering that with each other and with Nigeria. Nigeria and Cameroon will be under pressure to iron out their differences.

"This should be the last meeting, I think. We don't have any choice," Sani said. "If we don't go to find Boko Haram, they are going to come and find us."

US Intel support

Niger's military has carried out air strikes against Boko Haram positions and used ground forces to mop up the survivors, Sani said.

Sahelien.com, a regional news website, reported raids by Niger's troops who entered the Nigerian town of Marara on Feb. 15 and air strikes on Damasak on Feb. 16. A security source said the reports were accurate but gave no further details.

Sani denied the Niger air force was responsible for an attack on Tuesday that killed at least 36 civilians at a funeral in the border village of Abadam.

A local mayor said he believed a Nigerian military plane was responsible. Nigeria has denied this and Niger has said it is investigating.

Air power will play a key role but ground troops will then used to neutralise survivors in the wooded and mountainous terrain occupied by the Sunni jihadist group, Sani said

"Information on their location needs to come from human sources first, then you send technological resources to check it, and you maintain observation on them until air strikes arrive," he said.

Asked whether the U.S. military could help with drone intelligence on fighters' movements, he said: "That is already a reality. They help us in that sense."

"This is no longer a issue of national security for Nigeria, it's a question of regional and international security," he said. "If Nigeria implodes then the whole of Africa will feel it."

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...