Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Kaduna massacre 'not sectarian violence'

15 October 2012, 10:05

 Kaduna - The Nigerian army has said an armed assault on a mosque in which 21 people died was the result of a criminal feud and not sectarian violence.

The attack on Sunday was the bloodiest in a day of violence which also saw the restive north-eastern city of Maiduguri rocked by a roadside blast and two separate gun attacks that killed at least four people including a local chief, according to residents and the military.

The army and locals said the pre-dawn raid on the mosque in the village of Dogon Dawa, in the northern state of Kaduna, was carried out by armed robbers engaged in a running feud with a local vigilante group.

Having been repelled by the community militia last week, the gang returned on Sunday, storming the mosque as people prepared for early morning prayers, killing some victims inside the building and some outside.

"We have 21 killed. Several others have been taken to the hospital with injuries," said Musa Illela of the National Emergency Management Agency in Kaduna.

Suicide bombings at three churches in June, claimed by Islamist group Boko Haram, had sparked reprisal violence by Christian mobs who killed dozens of their Muslim neighbours and burned some of their victims' bodies. Muslim groups also formed mobs and killed several Christians.

Armed robbery

But military spokesperson Colonel Sani Usman told AFP that Sunday's shooting was "a clear case of armed robbery", and described it as a "revenge" attack linked to the rivalry between the thieves and the vigilantes.

Asked about a potential religious element in the shootings, he said only that "the victims were coming from prayers" at the mosque.

Village resident Dauda Maikudi told AFP that thieves regularly target the area as Dogon Dawa lies near a main road used by traders carrying goods and cash between the north and south of Africa's most populous country.

"It was a pre-dawn raid," he said. "The attackers... some of them dressed in police uniform, came into the village. They killed eight worshippers in the mosque and killed 13 other residents in the village."

"We believe they were armed robbers because this area has been bedevilled by armed robbers for years," he added.

Dogon Dawa lies about 70km from the state capital Kaduna city.

It was also unclear who was responsible for the bloodshed in Maiduguri.

A resident and doctor at a local hospital reported that gunmen there shot dead a married couple and their child as the family left church in Maiduguri's Gwange area.

A resident of the area, Bukar Kolo, told AFP that the gunmen fled after the attack outside the Church of Christ in Nigeria building.

Nation of unknown gunmen

In a separate incident, the traditional chief in Gwange, Mala Kaka, who has close ties to the area's top Islamic leader, was gunned down in his home, according to his guards and residents.

Kaka was close to the Shehu of Borno state, Umar Garbai el-Kanemi, a key cleric who Boko Haram tried to assassinate in July in a suicide blast in Maiduguri that killed five others but left Kanemi unharmed.

The radical Boko Haram Islamists have vowed to kill many of Nigeria's traditional Muslim leaders, who they accuse of betraying Islam by submitting to the authority of a secular government.

Boko Haram have also repeatedly attacked Christians attending Sunday worship across northern Nigeria, but there was no indication as to why the slain family may have been specifically targeted.

Commenting on the latest violence, Kaduna-based rights activist Shehu Sani said Nigeria had "become a nation of unknown gunmen and absentee leaders".

Nigeria, Africa's top oil producer, is roughly divided between a mainly north and mostly Christian south.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...