Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Nigeria ranked high with out-of-school children

11 June 2013, 09:06

Abuja- The UNESCO Education for All Global Monitoring Report (EAGMR) on Monday said that Nigeria accounted for almost a fifth of the worlds out-of-school children.

This is contained in a statement issued by Kate Redman, Communications Specialist, Education for All Global Monitoring Report (EAGMR), of UNESCO in Abuja.

According to the statement, the amount of aid to basic education Nigeria received in 2011 was 28 per cent lower than it received in 2010.

"It is in the top 10 countries for the largest decrease in aid from 2010-2011.”

The statement said a new statistics showed that 57 million children were out of school globally in 2011, which was a drop of two million from 2010.

It said that aid to basic education had decreased for the first time since 2002, adding that the world must move beyond helping children enter school to also ensure that they learnt the basics there.

"Our twin challenge is to get every child in school by understanding and acting on the multiple causes of exclusion and to ensure they learn with qualified teachers in healthy and safe environments.

It called on donors to renew their commitments so that no child was left out of school due to lack of resources.

According to the statement, the new figures released by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics show that countries in sub-Saharan Africa account for more than half of all out-of-school children and have the highest out-of-school rate.

The statement said that more than 20 per cent of African children had never attended primary school or left school without completing primary education.

``By contrast, countries in South and West Asia have made considerable gains over the past two decades, reducing the number of out-of-school children by two-thirds from 38 million in 1999 to 12 million in 2011.

``Children from poor households are three times as likely to be out of school as children from rich households,’’ it said.

It added that girls from poor households in rural areas were among the children facing the greatest barriers to education.

The statement said that although more children now entered school, there had been little progress in reducing the rate at which they left it.

"About 137 million children began primary school in 2011 but at least 34 million are likely to drop out before reaching the last grade.

"This translates into an early school leaving rate of 25 per cent, the same level as in 2000,’’ it said.

According to the statement, Sub-Saharan Africa and South and West Asia have the highest rate of early school leaving.

"New interventions are required to reduce this rate in order to achieve universal primary education and ensure that every child acquires basic literacy and numeric skills,’’ it said.

The statement said that "while out-of-school figures are stagnant, new analysis from the EAGMR reports finds that aid to basic education declined by six per cent between 2010 and 2011.’’

It also noted that funds were not directed to the regions and countries most in need, adding that only 1.9 billion dollars (about N296.4bn) was allocated to low income countries in 2011.

The report, however, urged donors to prioritise countries and regions most in need as sub-Saharan African accounted for more than half of out-of-school children.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...