Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Suicide bombers put women under suspicion in Kano

13 August 2014, 06:55

Kano - Women in Kano are abandoning their traditional religious dress after a spate of suicide bombings by young girls with explosives under their hijab.

The commercial city was hit last month by four separate attacks involving teenaged girls in the Muslim dress, leaving at least nine people dead and scores more injured.

Although no one has claimed responsibility for the bombings, fingers have been pointed at Boko Haram.

Also Read: Emir of Gwoza escapes terrorists camp

But the bombings have cast fear and suspicion on young women wearing the loose clothing, prompting many to dress differently.

"I no longer wear my hijab because people now see any young woman in hijab as a potential suicide bomber because of the recent incidents," said 17-year old Hajara Musa.

"I now put on my shawl (headscarf) when I go out pending the time the city gets over the trauma of this frightening trend," the fashion design apprentice told AFP.

Musa said she was recently barred from entering a shopping mall while dressed in a hijab, which covers the hair, neck and upper body, despite agreeing to be frisked.

"I was turned away because of my hijab, which I found very disturbing," she added.

Increased security

The hijab is a common sight in conservative Kano, an ancient seat of Islamic learning where it has become a convention of modesty for women leaving their homes or meeting men who are not relatives.

Many women wear the hijab with a traditional cloth wrapper that goes past their knees.

Adama Habibu, 21, said she preferred to wear the hijab but the recent bombings had forced her to stop to avoid attracting unnecessary attention.

Also Read: Women warned against interfering with soldiers posting

"Wherever a young woman in hijab goes people keep their distance from her out of fear she could be a suicide bomber," said Habibu, a student at Kano State Polytechnic, where a suicide blast on July 30 killed six people and injured 20 others.

The blasts, one of which targeted an upmarket shopping mall, has prompted increased security around businesses, with more police visible around public buildings and frequent patrols.

Shopping malls in the city have also deployed more security guards at their entrances who sweep shoppers with hand-held metal detectors and peer through handbags for explosives.

"I have stopped carrying a handbag around because of the suspicion it raises. I now carry a small purse wherever I go," said another Kano resident, Hafsat Yaya, who declined to give her age.

Men afraid

Men in the city also say they are more wary of young women in the hijab, said resident Bala Dawud.

"I shudder with fear when I find myself next to a young woman in hijab because she could be a suicide bomber," he added.

He recalled how a crowd which queued up at a cash machine melted away when a hijab-wearing woman joined the queue and asked if it was working.

"As soon as she was told yes, she pulled out her mobile phone and called someone, telling him she had found a machine dispensing cash and before you knew it the whole crowd dispersed, leaving the woman alone," Dawud said.

Also Read: Women decry use of teenage girls for suicide bombing

Women wearing niqab, which covers the whole face except the eyes, draw even more suspicion, said resident Samaila Abdussalam.

Boko Haram is blamed for killing more than 10 000 people since 2009 and their extreme tactics have been denounced worldwide.

And the new tactic of employing young women and girls as bombers has sharpened the concern and outrage.

On July 30, police in northern Katsina state arrested a 10-year-old girl with explosives strapped to her body.

A security source involved in forensic analysis of the Kano blasts cautioned residents against "hasty generalisation".

"From our preliminary findings, all the female suicide bombers were between 14 and 16 years which gives an idea of the age group of the bombers," the source said.

"We believe the explosives were remotely detonated which means the girls were sent under duress. So, people should be wary of young women who look nervous or fidgety in a crowd."



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...