Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Apple: Samsung copied iPhone

01 August 2012, 10:01

 San Jose - Samsung executives at the highest level made a decision to copy "every element" of the iPhone to compete in the smartphone market, a lawyer for Apple said as arguments began in a huge patent trial.

Harold McElhinny, a lawyer for Apple in the blockbuster patent trial underway in San Jose, California, told the jury that Samsung began the effort as soon as the iPhone was publicly unveiled in January 2007.

"At the same time [Apple co-founder Steve] Jobs introduced the iPhone, he warned his competitors that he had filed for patent protection on more than 200 new inventions in the iPhone," McElhinny said.

"Samsung was faced with a choice. Samsung could come up with its own designs, it could beat Apple fairly in the marketplace. Or it could copy Apple... it's easier to copy than to innovate."

The lawyer said Samsung copied specific features, including a "bounce-back" feature during the scrolling process and a design with a black-on-black face.

"At the highest corporate levels, Samsung decided to copy every element of the iPhone," he said.

"This was not accidental. Samsung's copying was intentional."

He argued that Samsung made continual changes as Apple updated its products.

"Over 100 times Samsung made detailed changes to its phones and tablets so that the end result was identical to Apple products," the lawyer said.

Competing claims

The comments came as jurors began hearing the biggest US patent trial in decades, with billions at stake for the two big tech giants.

A Samsung lawyer was set to respond later on Tuesday with the company's argument.

Just ahead of the arguments, US District Judge Lucy Koh allowed one of the 10 jurors to be dismissed after the woman said she was confused about whether she was getting paid.

"The stress of this case is causing anxiety. She's having panic attacks," the judge said.

"We understand this case would be a severe economic hardship on you."

Both sides agreed to the move which reduces the number of jurors hearing the case to nine, but does not impact the trial.

The case began on Monday with a pool of 70 prospective jurors in the courtroom, who faced questions about whether they, their friends or family members work for Apple, Samsung, Google, or Motorola.

Google is not directly involved in the case but its Android operating system is used on Samsung devices and will figure prominently in the case. Google recently acquired Motorola Mobility, another maker of mobile devices.

Apple is seeking more than $2.5bn in a case accusing the South Korean firm of infringing on designs and other patents from the iPhone and iPad maker.

Temporary injunctions

Samsung counters that Apple infringed on its patents for wireless communication, so the jury will sort out the competing claims.

This is one of several cases in courts around the world involving the two big electronics giants in the hottest part of the tech sector, tablet computers and smartphones.

While the results so far have been mixed in courts in Europe and Australia, Samsung is clearly on the defensive in the US case.

Koh, who will preside in the jury case, has issued two temporary injunctions against US sales of Samsung's 10-inch Galaxy tablet and the Galaxy Nexus smartphone developed with Google.

Samsung could face big risks: If Apple wins, it would automatically get a permanent injunction on sales of Samsung devices. And if Samsung makes only minor changes, Apple could ask for the Korean firm to be held in contempt.

The case has huge financial implications for both firms and the burgeoning industry for mobile devices.

A survey by research firm IDC showed Samsung shipped 50.2 million smartphones globally in the April-June period, while Apple sold 26 million iPhones. IDC said Samsung held 32.6% of the market to 16.9% for Apple.

Samsung is the leading maker of smartphones using Google's Android operating system, which has become the most popular platform despite complaints from Apple that it has infringed on its patents.


Tags samsung apple

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...