Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


'Candy Crush' gets gameplayers to pay

09 October 2013, 13:18

Stockholm - With 100 million people logging on every day for a fix of its games like Candy Crush Saga, global producer King is showing rivals not just how to hook players, but how to get them to pay.

King is the latest among European tech firms like Rovio, creator of mega-hit Angry Birds, and Mojang, behind Minecraft, to make it big on the global gaming scene. But its stunning profitability in an industry littered with firms who failed to make money from popular games has made it a totem for others seeking to emulate its success.

King's focus on the multi-billion dollar mobile games market - creating short, addictive puzzles for the fastest-growing part of the gaming industry - has helped it reap profits rare in its field.

Though the company does not publish numbers, industry experts have estimated its revenues at $1m - $3m a day. Media reports now talk about an IPO valuation of $5bn after a source recently said the company had filed to go public in the US.

King was set up in Sweden a decade ago by friends working at the same tech start-up and got €34m funding from Apax Partners and Index Ventures in 2005.


It has been profitable since, a fact that analysts put down to its ability to persuade players to pay several times over to continue the same game. Its "freemium model", in which games are free but players can pay for add-ons or extra lives, has been particularly effective because of the success of Candy Crush, described by some analysts as a global phenomenon.

"Candy Crush is one of the biggest mass market consumer games in years," said Adam Krejcik at Eilers Research in California. "They have been profitable for a while. This game has certainly brought them into a new category."

The puzzle game, in which players line up gleaming 3D sweets to knock out jelly, chocolate and liquorice, is available online, on smartphone and Facebook.

It has held the No 1 spot for apps on Facebook for nine months and is Apple's top-grossing US app, more popular than Spotify and TripAdvisor. King also says it is considering new platforms for the game such as smart TV.

Globally, mobile game revenues generated through Apple iOS & Google Playstore are expected to exceed $10bn this year, according to Krejcik. Roughly half of those are revenues generated by seven publishers including King, DeNa, GungHo Online and Electronic Arts.

According to King's Chief Creative Officer Sebastian Knutsson, Candy Crush is addictive because it's equal parts pain and fun and fits consumers' short attention span.

"We talk internally about... bite-sized entertainment, and we think that fits the mobile generation of today... short game rounds as opposed to having a super deep, long game," he said.

Social aspect

"Candies felt like something that everybody would have a positive feeling about... And I wanted something that could have shine and glossiness without being something unattainable," Knutsson said in a Stockholm office where meeting rooms have names like Bubble Witch Lair, after the game.

Players lured by the appealing graphics of Candy Crush can pay for more lives, or must wait for 30 minutes before they may start again - though some cheat and move the clocks on their smartphones ahead so they can continue.

The game's appeal was broadened by its social aspect: Players can share their progress on Facebook, swapping lives as well as tips on how to crack the various levels. Others share their pain: "Die Candy Crush. Die." writes one player, stuck at level 60, on King's Facebook page.

King says its decision last year to shift its focus to its mobile platform was pivotal because that market was booming and the game suited it well.

The candies worked well on mobile screens, Knutsson said. Analysts note the game is easy to hop in and out of, making it a good time killer for mobile players, yet offers new challenges to give players a new twist when they play again.

"We knew it would be big on Facebook but I think the mobile success is what really took us by surprise," Knutsson said.

The game's success led CEO of arch-rival Zynga, former Microsoft Xbox boss Don Mattrick to admit: "I'll fess up, I'm a Candy Crush player and I've enjoyed it."

California-based Zynga's trajectory demonstrates the fate of many others in the industry. In 2009 it developed social game FarmVille - a huge hit in which players harvested crops and raised livestock - but is now struggling to make money from it because it is still based on Facebook as players migrate in droves to mobile.

Zynga's stock price has slumped 65% since a high-profile $1bn IPO two years ago and it is now slashing staff numbers while closing offices.

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...