Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


'Christmas Comet' may be cracking up

18 October 2013, 14:37

Paris - An incoming comet that sky gazers had hoped would provide one of the greatest celestial shows of the century, could be a fizzle.

So say astronomers tracking the eagerly-awaited Comet Ison as it races to a searing encounter with the Sun.

Formally known as C/2012 S1 (Ison), the comet was spotted by a pair of hard-working amateur Russian astronomers, Vitaly Nevski and Artyom Novichonok, on 21 September 2012.

It is called Ison because they used a telescope called the International Scientific Optical Network near Kislovodsk, in the northern Caucasus.

After the discovery was validated by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), interest in the enigmatic wanderer became huge.


Calculations showed that after looping around the Sun, the comet would become a blaze of glory toward the end of the year - a timing that gave it the tabloid title of "Christmas Comet" or even "Comet of the Century".

But fears are multiplying that the great show will be cancelled.

Light signatures from Ison, which has just streaked past Mars, indicate the comet is about to break up, said Ignacio Ferrin, an astrophysicist at the University of Antioquia in Medellin, Colombia.

"This disintegration will take place before it reaches perihelion," said Ferrin. Perihelion is an orbit's closest point to the Sun, which Ison is supposed to reach on 28 November.

"There are also predictions for disintegration at perihelion. But based on the evidence, the comet will not get there," said Ferrin.

He explained that comets typically brighten as they get closer to the Sun, crossing a temperature threshold that causes their icy surfaces to evaporate, depositing water vapour, other gases and dust in their wake.

But, said Ferrin, the light curve from Ison slowed down and then remained practically constant, with no sign of greater brightness, as it raced forward.

This is a signature that matches four previous comets that have broken up catastrophically, he said.

Thermal stress

"Comets in general appear to be quite fragile, and are observed to fragment or split," said Duncan Steel, a visiting astronomer at Armagh Observatory in Northern Ireland.

"It has always been a good bet that Ison would do this, and there is now evidence that this may be now occurring."

Comets are believed to be huge clusters of primeval dust and frozen ices, including water and organic molecules that, say some, delivered the building blocks of life to the infant Earth.

Doomed to orbit the Sun in periods that can range from years to many millennia, comets undergo thermal stress as they near the star.

Veterans that make short-period flybys, such as Halley's Comet, appear to have a crust of silicates and "tarry" carbon molecules to insulate them from the heat.

But rare visitors such as Ison have no such protection, said Steel. Internal gases start to expand in the heat, stressing the crumbly "dirty snowball" structure.

Comets can also be torn apart by gravitational forces if they cross the path of a planet.

This famously happened with Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, whose fate was dictated by Jupiter. Fragments of the comet smashed into the Jovian giant in 1994.

Solar furnace

Even if the gloomy predictions are wrong, Ison still has to survive the climax of its ordeal by fire.

A "Sun-grazing" comet, at perihelion, it will be less than 1.2 million kilometres from the surface of the star - just three times the distance between the Earth and Moon - and subjected to temperatures of 2 800°C.

According to preliminary estimates by the Lowell Observatory and Southwest Research Institute in Arizona, Ison has a good chance of surviving the solar furnace and gravitational rip at perihelion.

Comets smaller than 200m across almost always are destroyed when passing at such a distance. Ison appears to be between 1 000m and 4 000m across.

What, though, will be left of Ison after it has kissed the Sun?

Will enough remain for it to be a real comet? Or will it be just a sad, shrivelled lump?

"We have absolutely no idea," said Patrick Rocher, of the Institute of Celestial Mechanics at the Paris Observatory.


Tags astronomy

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...