Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Comet-probing robot to wake up

27 March 2014, 07:51

Paris - A fridge-sized robot lab hurtling through the Solar System aboard a European probe is about to wake from hibernation and prepare for the first-ever landing by a spacecraft on a comet.

The delicate operation, starting on Friday, marks the next phase in the European Space Agency's billion-dollar mission to explore one of these ancient wanderers of our star system.

Sent to sleep in 2011 to save energy, the lander will start a weeks-long process of progressively waking up, checking and updating its systems ahead of its historic rendezvous with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

Dubbed Philae, the 100kg lander carried by the Rosetta spacecraft is the scientific star in a mission that has already taken 10 years and a seven-billion-kilometre trek around the inner Solar System.

Comets follow elliptical orbits around the Sun, spewing spectacular tails of gas and dust as close brushes with the hot star cause surface ice to evaporate.

Organic chemistry

They are sometimes called "dirty snowballs" - but cosmologists say comets' primeval mix of ice and dust are time capsules, offering insights into how the Solar System formed 4.5 billion years ago.

Some scientists believe comets may have brought much of the water in today's oceans and possibly complex molecules that kick-started life on Earth.

This is where Philae comes in: It is stuffed with 10 instruments designed to probe and analyse the comet's surface, teasing out the secrets of its composition and organic chemistry.

Philippe Gaudon of France's CNES space agency said Philae's 33-month slumber was almost exactly "like an animal in hibernation", for only its temperature was monitored during this time to check it remained alive in the chill of deep space.

The wakeup, he added, "will be like switching on a computer that's been off for three years".

"By the beginning of July, Rosetta will be about 50 000km from the comet, by the beginning of August no more than 150km," said Gaudon.

In August, the satellite will be inserted into an orbit 25km above Comet "C-G", which travels at speeds up to 135 000km/h, to start scanning the surface for a suitable landing site for Philae.


On 11 November, Rosetta will inch to within 2km to 3km of the comet surface to put down its precious load in a "delicate, difficult" operation, said Gaudon.

The box-shaped lander will touch down on its three legs, fire two harpoons into the surface to provide anchorage, and then further secure itself with ice screws before starting its work.

Cameras will send back images of the surface, and microscopes and spectrometers will analyse the soil from samples taken from as deep as 24cm.

Over the last quarter-century, 11 unmanned spacecraft have been sent on missions to comets, but none has landed.

The US Stardust probe brought home dusty grains snatched from a comet's wake, while Europe's Giotto ventured to within 200km of a comet's surface.

If the landing goes well, Philae's mission will last four to six months, enough to explore the comet "from all angles", said Gaudon.

But if it fails to wake up or trips up on landing, the mission will continue with observations by Rosetta itself as it accompanies the comet in its loop around the Sun for a total 17 months.


Tags space

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...