Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Extinction concerns over China 'river pig'

19 April 2012, 21:16

Shanghai - China says 16 endangered finless porpoise have been found dead since the beginning of the year, due in part to what experts suspect is water pollution and climate change, state media reported.

The freshwater porpoise - which is known in Chinese as the "river pig" - mainly lives in China's Yangtze River and two lakes linked to the waterway, and the deaths have raised concern the rare animal is headed for extinction.

Since March, authorities have discovered 10 dead porpoises in Dongting Lake in the central province of Hunan, the official Xinhua news agency said late on Wednesday.

Another six porpoise bodies have been found in Poyang Lake in the eastern province of Jiangxi since the beginning of the year, it said.

"The recent deaths brought the mortality rate of the finless porpoise [to] between 5% to 10%, which means the species will be functionally extinct in 15 years," Xinhua quoted experts as saying.

Economic growth

Wang Kexiong, a researcher at China's Institute of Hydrobiology, said water pollution, shipping, sand dredging and illegal fishing were all possible causes of the recent deaths.

Many waterways in China have become heavily contaminated with toxic waste from factories and farms - pollution blamed on more than three decades of rapid economic growth and lax enforcement of environmental protection laws.

Climate change, which has caused water levels to drop and make it more difficult for the porpoises to find food, is another possible factor, the report said.

Tests have shown that some of the porpoises are believed to have died of starvation, it said.

In 2006, China was estimated to have only 1 200 finless porpoises left. That same year, the Baiji - a freshwater dolphin also native to the Yangtze River - was declared extinct.

Earlier this year, a survey found just 65 "river pigs" in Dongting Lake and 300 to 400 in Poyang Lake, the report said.

The finless porpoise has been classified as vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, a global environment network which groups governments and NGOs.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
1 comment
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...