Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Gardening tools go mobile

13 August 2013, 13:05

New York – Smartphones that respond to signals from plants? Laptops that co-ordinate irrigation at dozens of vineyards? Remote weather stations programmed to text frost alerts?

Many commercial growers are using laptops, tablets or smartphones to keep costs down and production up. Home gardeners too, if they can afford it.

Apps may get more attention, but they're small potatoes compared with the software and online programs already at work or being tested for horticultural use. Simply scanning a monitor or applying a few keystrokes can save water and fuel, redirect a labour force or protect a crop.

"The online-based software is really the heart that drives all this technology," said Paul Goldberg, director of operations at Bettinelli Vineyards and a director of Napa Valley Grapegrowers.

"A good portion of my day is now spent monitoring vineyards and making decisions to control certain vineyard operations via my phone or tablet in the field."

Perhaps the most powerful viticultural tool to come along in recent years is the solar-powered remote weather station, Goldberg said. These self-contained units are scattered throughout hundreds of vineyards providing site-specific streaming weather data.

"Even more impressive is that the stations' online software can be set to notify growers with a phone call or text if something goes awry like a sudden pressure drop from a broken irrigation pipe, a well running dry or a decline in temperature posing a frost threat in the spring," he said.

Remote weather stations have become the platforms for integrating other powerful technology to manage vineyards from afar, Goldberg said.


- Sap flow monitors that turn grapevines into living sensors by telling growers when or even if they need water. "This technology paired with other sophisticated tools has made irrigation much more of an exact science," Goldberg said.

- Wind machines controlled by computer, tablet or smartphone.

- Data collection. Growers can access vineyard information, work orders, fertilizer and irrigation programs, graphs, and a variety of viticulture tools from tablets or smartphones in the field.

Horticulturists at The Ruth Bancroft Garden in Walnut Creek, California, meantime, irrigate with a computerised system that automatically shuts down after a certain amount of water has been used rather than being operated by timers.

"The amount of water that can come out in a given time could be variable, so it's easy to over- or underwater if you're just using a timer," said Andrew Wong, Bancroft's head gardener. "They're also great if you live in a community that has water restrictions. If you're allotted 500 gallons, then that's what you'll use."

Another tech tool used at the garden is a self-guided audio tour that responds to prompts from smartphone users. "It provides information not found in our garden pamphlets," Wong said.

Burpee Home Gardens has introduced two mobile web tools, not apps, using smartphones as gardening tools. Gardeners can specify the size and location of their plant sites and "My Garden Designer" does the rest, creating "recipes" for easily planted containers or flowerbeds.

"Burpee Garden Coach" is a free mobile web tool that provides online tutoring. Users customise their profiles by supplying their zip codes to receive a continuing series of tips on flower or vegetable gardening via text messages or e-mail alerts.

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...