Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Google fined $22m for violating privacy

10 August 2012, 15:13

 San Francisco - Google is paying a $22.5m fine to settle the latest regulatory case questioning the internet search leader's respect for people's privacy and the integrity of its internal controls.

The penalty announced on Thursday by the Federal Trade Commission matches the figure reported by The Associated Press and other media outlets last month. It's the most that the FTC has ever fined a company for a civil violation.

The rebuke resolves the FTC's allegations that Google duped millions of Web surfers who use Apple's Safari browser.

Google had assured people that it wouldn't monitor their online activities, as long as they didn't change the browser settings to permit the tracking.

Google broke that promise, according to the FTC, by creating a technological loophole that enabled the company's DoubleClick advertising network to shadow unwitting Safari users. That tracking gave DoubleClick a better handle on what kinds of marketing pitches to show them.

The FTC concluded that the contradiction between Google's stealth tracking and its privacy assurances to Safari users violated a vow that the company made in another settlement with the agency in October.

The latest settlement doesn't affect a separate FTC inquiry over whether Google has been abusing its dominant position in internet search to highlight its own services over rivals and drive up online advertising prices. The settlement also doesn't come with any admission from Google of wrongdoing.

The company has acknowledged that DoubleClick was tracking Safari users, but insists the monitoring wasn't by design.

All Google wanted to do, according to the company, was create a way for Safari users to press on a button to signal they recommended an ad. Google said it didn't realise its tinkering altered Safari's automatic privacy settings in a way that allowed for broader surveillance.

After the circumvention was publicised in February by a graduate student at Stanford University, Google stopped the tracking on Safari. The company says it never collected any personal information.

"We set the highest standards of privacy and security for our users," Google said on Thursday.

Google's actions, though, have cast doubts about the sincerity of its commitment.

The Safari intrusion is the latest privacy stumble at Google, whose dominant internet search engine and popular email service provide valuable peepholes into people's minds.

In 2010, Google set up a social networking service called Buzz that exposed people's email contacts. Following an FTC investigation, Google agreed to 20 years of oversight and a pledge not to mislead consumers about privacy issues.

That's the pledge that the FTC says Google broke with Safari.

Google also got in trouble for collecting personal data transmitted over unprotected Wi-Fi networks as Google cars cruised neighbourhoods around the world taking pictures for the company's online mapping service.

The FTC didn't take action against Google for scooping up the Wi-Fi data, although the Federal Communications Commission fined the company $25 000 earlier this year for impeding its investigation into the matter.

As it did with the secret tracking on Safari, Google has framed those privacy breaches as inadvertent slips.

That defense is wearing thin, according to David Vladeck, the director of the FTC's bureau of consumer protection.

"In some ways, as a regulator, it's hard to know which answer is worst: 'I didn't know' or 'I did it deliberately.' Both are bad," Vladeck told reporters on a Thursday conference call.

The FTC hopes the fine will force Google to pay better attention to its practices.

"It's a big company," Vladeck said. "It's grown very quickly, but the social contract is if you are going to hold on to people's most private data, you have got to do a better job of honoring your privacy commitment."

Those terse remarks underscore Google's increasingly tense relationship with regulators around the world. Both the FTC and the European Commission are engaged in broad antitrust investigations of Google. The company, which is based in Mountain View, California, has submitted a list of concessions in an attempt to settle Europe's probe, while the FTC's inquiry remains open.

Although the $22.5m fine is a record for the FTC, it won't leave much of a financial dent at Google. The company had $43bn in cash at the end of June and generates $22.5m in revenue roughly every four hours.

"This record fine will send a signal to a lot of internet companies, but there's still some question whether the FTC has the authority and resources to rein in an entity as big and powerful as Google," said Carl Tobias, a Richmond University law professor who followed the Safari case.

Bad publicity may be the bigger blow for Google, which takes so much pride in its scruples that it has adopted "Don't Be Evil" as its corporate motto.

"This has to sting. They don't want to lose too much goodwill," said Justin Brookman, director of consumer privacy for the Center for Democracy & Technology.

The FTC's willingness to settle with Google without an admission of wrongdoing troubled one of the agency's own commissioners, J. Thomas Rosch. He voted against the settlement because he didn't believe the agreement was in the public interest without Google admitting liability.

But the FTC's four other commissioners voted in favor of the settlement.

"We don't get anything out of an admission other than a good headline," Vladeck said. "It is not of any practical value to us."

The fine surpasses a nearly $19m penalty that the FTC slapped on a telemarketer accused of duping people into believing they were donating to charities.

Without providing specifics, the FTC said the Google fine represents several times more than what Google made from the targeted ads that it distributed through Safari.

Consumer Watchdog, a California group that has emerged among Google's most strident critics, said it may challenge the settlement unless Google admits it broke the privacy promise made with the Buzz settlement.

"The commission has allowed Google to buy its way out of trouble for an amount that probably is less than the company spends on lunches for its employees and with no admission it did anything wrong," Consumer Watchdog complained.

News of the FTC's fine didn't faze investors as Google shares added 12 cents to close Thursday at $642.35. Although it was modest, the gain was still enough to boost Google's market value by about $39m, nearly twice the amount of the fine.

- AP

Tags google

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...