Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Israel seeks to export cyber tech

30 January 2014, 09:51

Tel Aviv - Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced a bold initiative this week calling on tech giants and Western powers to band together to protect the world from cyber attacks, vowing to relax export restrictions normally placed on security-related technologies so Israeli cyber defence companies can sell their expertise around the globe.

Making this vision a reality, however, will be complicated.

Industry experts say that tech companies and intelligence agencies would likely be loath to trade secrets and reveal their own vulnerabilities.

Israel also risks compromising its own national security by allowing cyber companies, mostly formed by graduates of stealth Israeli security units, to export advanced technologies that enemies could use against Israel.

"We are taking a gamble," Netanyahu acknowledged at a cyber technology conference on Monday. "Entailing some risks, but willing to do so to get much bigger gain."


Israel established a national cyber bureau two years ago to co-ordinate defence against attacks on the country's infrastructures and networks, such as a virus that recently shut down a major Israeli roadway two days in a row.

The bureau also seeks to boost Israel's economy by building up its cyber defence industry. In the last few years, the number of Israeli cyber defence companies has ballooned from a few dozen to more than 200, accounting for 5% to 10% of the global cyber security industry, said Eviatar Matania, head of Israel's national cyber bureau.

Matania estimated the global industry to be worth $60bn to $80bn a year. Check Point Software Technologies, one of the world's leading cyber security firms, was founded in Israel.

"By developing more and more human capital in the area... we will be able to be a global cyber incubator," Matania said.

This week, international giants IBM and Lockheed Martin announced new cyber research projects in Israel, and Deutsche Telekom and EMC have also established research centres in the country.

Hundreds of cyber security companies and experts, including directors of cyber security in the US Department of Homeland Security, attended this week's expo of Israeli security companies and start-ups in Tel Aviv.

Israel has established itself as a world leader in cyber technology innovation, fuelled by graduates of prestigious and secretive military and security intelligence units. These units are widely thought to be behind some of the world's most advanced cyber attacks, including the Stuxnet virus, which attacked Iran's nuclear energy equipment.

International treaty

Each year, these units churn out a talent pool of young Israelis who translate their experience executing or protecting against advanced cyber attacks to the corporate world. But regulation of the industry to bar Israeli secrets and knowhow from leaving the country - like limits that Israel puts on weapons exports - has been almost nonexistent.

The same is true in other countries: Only last month did Western signatories to the Wassenaar Arrangement, an international treaty that regulates arms sales, move to place restrictions on the cyber technology trade. Israel is not a signatory to the Wassenaar Arrangement, but the country says its weapons trade policies follow the spirit of the agreement.

Israel's national cyber bureau said it is currently formulating rules on what cyber technologies cannot be exported. Rami Efrati of the bureau said those regulations would be completed within six months.

"I don't think cyber is a secret," said Efrati, who is heading the bureau's effort to boost the Israeli cyber defense industry. "On the other hand we have to be very sensitive about this question, in order to make sure we will have an advantage in such technology."

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...