Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Search for 1st web page takes detour

11 June 2013, 12:05

London - For the European physicists who created the world wide web, preserving its history is as elusive as unlocking the mysteries of how the universe began.

The scientists at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, known by its French acronym Cern, are searching for the first web page.

It was at Cern that Tim Berners-Lee invented the web in 1990 as an unsanctioned project, using a NeXT computer that Apple co-founder Steve Jobs designed in the late 80s during his 12-year exile from the company.

Dan Noyes oversees Cern's website and has taken on the project to uncover the world's first web page. He said that no matter how much data they sort through, researchers may never make a clear-cut discovery of the original web page because of the nature of how data is shared.

"The concept of the earliest web page is kind of strange," Noyes said. "It's not like a book. A book exists through time. Data gets overwritten and looped around. To some extent, it is futile."


In April, Cern restored a 1992 copy of the first-ever website that Berners-Lee created to arrange Cern-related information. It was the earliest copy Cern could find at the time, and Noyes promised then to keep looking.

After National Public Radio did a story on the search, a professor at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill came forward with a 1991 version.

Paul Jones met Berners-Lee during the British scientist's visit to the US for a conference in 1991, just a year after Berners-Lee invented the web. Jones said Berners-Lee shared the page with the professor, who has transferred it from server to server through the years. A version remains on the internet today at an archive Jones runs, ibiblio.

The page Jones received from Berners-Lee is locked in Jones' NeXT computer, behind a password that has long been forgotten. Forensic computer specialists are trying to extract the information to check time stamps and preserve the original coding used to generate the page.

The web page preserved by Jones is both familiar and quaint. There are no flashy graphics or video clips. Instead, it is a page of text on a white background with 19 hyperlinks. Some of the links, such as ones leading to information about Cern, have been updated and still work. On the other hand, a link to the phone numbers for Cern staffers is dead.

Noyes said he'll keep searching for earlier versions of the page. Noyes said his project still has to sort through plenty of old disks and other data submitted following NPR's story. He suspects there will be a couple of pages to pop up that were created months before the version Jones has.


The internet itself dates back to 1969, when computer scientists gathered in a lab at the University of California, Los Angeles to exchange data between two bulky computers. In the early days, the internet had e-mail, message boards known as Usenet and online communities such as The WELL.

Berners-Lee was looking for ways to control computers remotely at Cern. His innovation was to combine the internet with another concept that dates to the 1960s: Hypertext, which is a way of presenting information non-sequentially.

Although he never got the project formally approved, his boss suggested he quietly tinker with it anyway. Berners-Lee began writing the software for the web in October 1990, got his browser working by mid-November and added editing features in December. He made the program available at Cern by 25 December.

- AP

Tags cern internet

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...