Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


To the Moon or bust - US debates next lunar step

23 July 2014, 06:27

Cape Canaveral - Forty-five years after the first Apollo lunar landing, the US remains divided about the Moon's role in future human space exploration.

Ten more US astronauts followed Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin's 20 July 1969, visit to the moon before the Apollo programme was cancelled in 1972. No one has been back since.

The most recent effort to return astronauts to the moon ended in 2010 when the Obama White House axed an underfunded programme of the previous administration called Constellation. Instead, Nasa was directed to begin planning for a human expedition to an asteroid.

That initiative, slated for 2025, also includes a robotic precursor mission to redirect a small asteroid or piece of a larger asteroid into a high lunar orbit.

Astronauts would then rendezvous with the relocated asteroid and pick up samples for return to Earth. The missions are intended as steppingstones for eventual human expeditions to Mars.

Moon return

This path, however, is fraught with technological cul-de-sacs that do not directly contribute to radiation protection, landing systems, habitats and other projects needed to build the road to Mars, a National Research Council panel concluded in June.

After a three-year study of different options for human space exploration, the panel said a more viable and sustainable path would be to return to the Moon.

"The Moon, and in particular its surface, [has] significant advantages over other targets as an intermediate step on the road to the horizon goal of Mars," the council's Committee on Human Spaceflight wrote in a report.

"Although some have dismissed the Moon as no longer interesting because humans have visited it before, this is similar to considering the New World to have been adequately explored after the first four voyages of Columbus."

Nasa considers the Moon "the purview of other nations' space programs", and "not of interest to the US human space exploration programme", the report said.

"This argument is made despite the barely touched scientific record of the earliest solar system that lies hidden in the lunar crust, despite its importance as a place to develop the capabilities required to go to Mars, and despite the fact that the technical capabilities and operational expertise of Apollo belong to our grandparent's generation," the report added.

Under current plans, it will be another 11 years before US astronauts travel beyond the International Space Station, a permanently staffed research laboratory that flies about 420km above Earth. A mission to Mars is at least a decade or more beyond that - if it happens at all.

"It is clear to me that we will not be able to build a long-term research base on Mars if we don't first do it on the Moon," planetary scientist Chris McKay wrote in a paper entitled The Case for a Nasa Research Base on the Moon that was published in 2013 in the journal New Space.

Political hurdles

"New technologies and approaches - and increased international interest in the moon make the time right to consider pushing for a base that is 10 times less expensive than previous base designs," McKay added in an e-mail.

Development of the Orion space capsule, Space Launch System heavy-lift rocket and launch pad renovations at the Kennedy Space Centre in Florida currently cost Nasa more than $3bn a year.

Ultimately, the hurdles on the path to Mars are political, not technical, in nature, the National Research Council report concludes.

"Probably the most significant single factor in allowing progress beyond low Earth orbit is the development of a strong national (and international) consensus about the pathway to be undertaken and sustained discipline in not tampering with that plan over many administrations and Congresses," the panel said.

- Reuters

Tags nasa space

Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...