Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Lance admits doping to Oprah

15 January 2013, 12:31

Austin - Cyclist Lance Armstrong has admitted to talk show host Oprah Winfrey that he used performance-enhancing drugs in a lengthy interview to be aired later this week, USA Today reported on Monday.

A confession would mark a stunning reversal after Armstrong spent years strenuously denying doping allegations, sticking to his story even after being publicly shamed and stripped of his seven Tour de France titles last year.

Any admission of guilt could also have legal or financial ramifications, particularly among big-name corporate sponsors such as Nike that had loyally stood by him even as the allegations grew.

It was Armstrong's first interview since he was stripped in October of his Tour de France titles after the US Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) said he helped orchestrate the most sophisticated doping programme in sports history.

Winfrey was set to appear on CBS television's "This Morning" programme on Tuesday to promote the interview.

She did not reveal details of the interview ahead of its Thursday night air date on her OWN cable network and its website, but took to Twitter to say Monday's exchange had lasted more than two and a half hours.

"He came READY!" she tweeted.

The announcement that Armstrong had agreed to an interview had sparked widespread speculation that he might finally confess to being a drug cheat after years of adamant denials.

Reporters, photographers and TV crews took up positions earlier across the street from Armstrong's opulent Austin home, where the interview took place and which is surrounded by an eight-foot stone wall.

USA Today, which cited an unnamed person familiar with the interview as saying Armstrong had admitted to doping, had earlier indicated that the cyclist did not plan to go into great detail about specific cases and events.

Armstrong's spokesperson Mark Fabiani declined to address the reports, saying: "We have an arrangement with Oprah's team not to comment until the show is broadcast and we are honoring that."

Richard Pound, the former head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, said on Monday he would have liked to see Armstrong face a proper interrogation panel and that a confession could backfire if critics aren't satisfied with the platform he chose.

"I would have preferred he did it in front of 'Face The Nation' or 'Meet the Press' and get some hard questions from people," Pound said, referring to prominent US Sunday television news talk shows.

"What he risks if he gets a softball outcome is people will be even more put off."

Pound said he thinks Armstrong might be hoping a confession would pave the way for USADA to lift his lifetime ban so that he can return to competing in marathons and triathlons.

But, he added, Armstrong would have to be willing to tell all for that to happen.

Before the taping, Armstrong personally apologized to staff members at Livestrong, the charity he founded to support cancer survivors.

"Lance came to the Livestrong Foundation's headquarters today for a private conversation with our staff and offered a sincere and heartfelt apology for the stress they've endured because of him," Livestrong spokesperson Rae Bazzarre said.

She added that Armstrong - a cancer survivor who founded the charity in 1997 - urged Livestrong staffers "to keep up their great work fighting for people affected by cancer."

Since the International Cycling Union effectively erased Armstrong from the record books, The Sunday Times of Britain has sued him for more than £1 million over a libel payment made to him in 2006.

It had paid Armstrong £300 000 to settle a libel case after publishing a story suggesting he may have cheated, and now wants that money, plus interest and legal costs, repaid.

A Texas insurance company has also threatened legal action to recoup millions of dollars in bonuses it paid him for multiple Tour victories.

Armstrong's years of dominance in the sport's greatest race raised cycling's profile in the United States to new heights.

It also gave the Texan - diagnosed in 1996 with late-stage testicular cancer that had spread to his brain and lungs - a unique platform to promote cancer awareness and research.

The Lance Armstrong Foundation has raised almost $500 million since its creation 16 years ago.

In the wake of the allegations, several top sponsors dumped Armstrong, and on November 14, Livestrong dropped his name from the foundation.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...