Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Sharapova slams heat policy

17 January 2014, 09:43

Melbourne - Maria Sharapova criticised Australian Open organisers for a lack of transparency over their "extreme heat policy" when the Russian was left toiling on court for nearly an hour after organisers had invoked an official halt on Thursday.

Sharapova and her opponent Karin Knapp of Italy slugged it out in 40 degrees Celsius heat at Rod Laver Arena for three-and-a-half hours before the Russian prevailed 6-3 4-6 10-8 in their marathon second round encounter.

The pair were already struggling in the oppressive conditions but continued their arduous battle some 50 minutes after matches on outside courts were suspended at about 04:50.

Players have slammed organisers for failing to call off matches earlier, with some describing the conditions as dangerous, and one Croatian player in the men's draw expressing fear for his life on Wednesday.

Rather than use the raw Celsius readings to assess the heat, organisers prefer to use the Wet Bulb Global Temperature composite, which also gauges humidity and wind to identify the perceived conditions.

Under a change to the rules for this year, the decision on whether to stop matches is now at the discretion of tournament referee Wayne McKewen.

"There is no way getting around the fact that the conditions were extremely difficult, and have been for the last few days," the third seed Sharapova told reporters.

"It's a tough call. I mean, I think the question I have is no one really knows what the limit is.

"Not the players (nor) the trainers themselves when you ask them when will the roof be closed.

"No one actually knows what that number is in comparison to humidity or the actual heat.

"Sometimes you wish you knew, because it's - it just depends on I'm not sure who, a referee or the meteorologist, and there are just a lot of questions in the air that maybe should be solved.

"I asked the trainer the other day, 'what does it take for the roof to be closed or matches to be stopped?' She said, 'we have no control over this'."

Despite the suspension, players could only walk off court at the conclusion of the set they were playing, according to the policy.

With no tiebreaks in deciding third sets for the women entrants at the Australian Open, nor for fifth sets for the men, Sharapova and Knapp's battle continued well after the suspension was called, with Rod Laver Arena's retractable roof left open.

"I think the question is from the second to the third set," Sharapova said of the unused roof.

"That's because everyone knows there is no tiebreaker in the third set, so once you start that set, you're going to be out there until you're done. That's the question I have.

"I would love to know a bit more detail before - not even before I get on the court, but just in general it's good to know. I didn't even know there was no play when I left the court. I mean, I had no idea."

Sharapova, who will meet 25th-seeded Frenchwoman Alize Cornet in the third round, joked that she was getting "numb" to the heat in her courtside interview but will surely look forward to far cooler temperatures forecast for the weekend.

"I'm really happy to get through," she said. "I really am. I worked really hard in the last few months and I wanted this match. I didn't play my best tennis, I didn't do many things well."

"I got through it and sometimes that's what's important."

- Reuters


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...