Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Brazil concerned at report of NSA spying

08 July 2013, 13:02

Paraty - Brazil's foreign minister said on Sunday his government is worried by a report that the United States has collected data on billions of telephone and email conversations in his country and promised an effort for international protection of Internet privacy.

The O Globo newspaper reported over the weekend that information released by NSA leaker Edward Snowden shows that the number of telephone and email messages logged by the US National Security Agency in Brazil in January alone was not far behind the 2.3 billion reportedly collected in the United States.

Foreign Minister Antonio Patriota, speaking from the colonial city of Paraty where he was attending Brazil's top literary festival, expressed "deep concern at the report that electronic and telephone communications of Brazilian citizens are being the object of espionage by organs of American intelligence.

"The Brazilian government has asked for clarifications" through the US Embassy in Brazil and Brazil's embassy in Washington, he said.

Patriota also said Brazil will ask the UN for measures "to impede abuses and protect the privacy" of Internet users, laying down rules for governments "to guarantee cybernetic security that protects the rights of citizens and preserves the sovereignty of all countries".

Diplomatic turbulence

The spokesperson for the US Embassy in Brazil's capital, Dean Chaves, said diplomats there would not have any comment.

But the Office of the Director of National Intelligence issued a statement saying, "The US government will respond through diplomatic channels to our partners and allies in the Americas ... While we are not going to comment publicly on specific alleged intelligence activities, as a matter of policy we have made clear that the United States gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations."

The chairperson of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff warned on Sunday that Snowden's overall disclosures have undermined US relationships with other countries and affected what he calls "the importance of trust".

General Martin Dempsey told CNN's "State of the Union" that the US will "work our way back, but it has set us back temporarily".

Patriota's reaction in Brazil extended diplomatic turbulence the US has faced from friends and foes around the world since Snowden began releasing details of the surveillance.

Germany's top security official suggested last month that Internet users could shun operations that use US-based computer servers to avoid security worries.


France's Interior Minister used a 4 July garden party at the US Embassy in Paris to complain about alleged US spying, saying "such practices, if proven, do not have their place between allies and partners".

Hong Kong officials last month declined a US request to extradite the former NSA contract worker amid indications of displeasure over his revelation that the former British colony had been a target of American hacking.

The O Globo article said that "Brazil, with extensive digitalised public and private networks operated by large telecommunications and internet companies, appears to stand out on maps of the US agency as a priority target for telephony and data traffic, alongside nations such as China, Russia and Pakistan."

The report did not describe the sort of data collected, but the US programs appear to gather what is called metadata: logs of message times, addresses and other information rather than the content of the messages.

The report was co-authored by US journalist Glenn Greenwald, who originally broke the Snowden story in the Britain-based Guardian newspaper, where he writes a regularly blog.

Cuban safe passage

In a Sunday posting, Greenwald wrote that "the NSA has, for years, systematically tapped into the Brazilian telecommunication network and indiscriminately intercepted, collected and stored the email and telephone records of millions of Brazilians."

He said Brazil was merely an example of a global practice.

"There are many more populations of non-adversarial countries which have been subjected to the same type of mass surveillance net by the NSA: indeed, the list of those which haven't been are shorter than those which have," he wrote.

The O Globo article said the NSA collected the data through an association between US and Brazilian telecommunications companies. It said it could not verify which Brazilian companies were involved or if they were aware their links were being used to collect the data.

"It's most likely that any monitoring was done of undersea cables and satellites. For international transmissions and calls, the majority of the cables pass through the United States," Paulo Bernardo, Brazil's communications minister, told O Globo.

"We're extremely concerned about this news, especially the possible involvement of Brazilian companies. If that actually happened, it would be a crime under Brazilian law."

Brazil was among several nations asked to provide political asylum by Snowden in recent days. The foreign ministry said last week that it did "not plan to respond" to the leaker's request, though spokespeople declined to say they explicitly denied his application.

Other Latin American nations - Venezuela, Bolivia and Nicaragua - have already said they will grant asylum. On Sunday, Cuban President Raul Castro said he supported those countries' apparent willingness to grant Snowden asylum, but he did not say whether Cuba itself would offer him refuge or safe passage.

While some Brazilians were upset by the revelations, others seemed to shrug.

"On the one hand, the size of the US espionage program and the number of Brazilians who fell into it is ridiculous," said Rodolfo Andrade, a 29-year-old businessman in Sao Paulo. "On the other hand, it helps international security."

- AP


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...