Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Burundi: Tallying of votes continues

22 July 2015, 16:22

Bujumbura - Polling stations have closed and votes have started to be counted in Burundi's controversial presidential elections, in which incumbent Pierre Nkurunziza is widely expected to win a third consecutive term.

Ballots will continue to be tallied on Wednesday, but officials have said that they do not expect the results to be announced until Thursday.

Shortly before voting started on Tuesday, a policeman and a civilian were killed amid a string of explosions and gunfire in the capital Bujumbura, the epicentre of three months.

Also Read: Burundi counts votes after controversial presidential polls

Al Jazeera's Haru Mutasa, reporting from Bujumbura, said that one member of the opposition was also killed overnight in the city's Nyakabiga neighbourhood. The incident prompted a big crowd to gather there in protest in the morning.

The body was removed on Tuesday, several hours after the incident. But the crowd who were boycotting the elections still stayed on at the incident spot, with riot police mobilised near them keeping a safe distance.

Violation of 2006 peace deal

About 3.8 million Burundians were eligible to vote in the polls, which the opposition and civil society groups are boycotting, claiming they will not be free and fair.

Electoral Commission president Pierre-Claver Ndayicariye said turnout was low in Bujumbura and south-western Bururi province, but gave an overall figure of 74%, comparable to that of last month's general elections.

The opposition have denounced the candidacy of the incumbent president as unconstitutional and a violation of the 2006 peace deal that ended a dozen years of civil war and ethnic massacres in 2006.

A spokesperson for the US said the elections lacked credibility and by pressing ahead, the government risked its "legitimacy".

State department spokesperson John Kirby said, the vote "will further discredit the government".

The nation's constitutional court has ruled in the president's favour, however, maintaining he is eligible for a third term because he was chosen by legislators - and not popularly elected - for his first term.

Also Read: Ban Ki-moon urges calm in Burundi vote

Nkurunziza told journalists he was allowing "the Burundian people to vote or to choose someone they believe in". The president arrived to vote in his home village of Buye on bike.

Ban Ki-moon, the UN secretary-general, has called on authorities to do all in their power to ensure security and a peaceful atmosphere during the election.

"He [Ban] further calls on all parties to refrain from any acts of violence that could compromise the stability of Burundi and the region," his spokesperson said in a statement on his behalf.

More than two months of anti-Nkurunziza protests, which have often been violently repressed, have left at least 100 dead since late April.

Independent media has been shut down and many opponents have fled - joining an exodus of more than 150 000 Burundians who fear their country may again be engulfed by widespread violence.

Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said on Monday about a thousand people were fleeing each day into Tanzania.

In mid-May, rebel generals attempted to overthrow Nkurunziza in a coup. After that failed, they launched a rebellion in the north of the country.

Renewed conflict

Last-ditch crisis talks mediated by Uganda broke down on Sunday.

"The government has opted to isolate itself and go ahead with pseudo-elections," said Leonce Ngendakumana, a prominent opposition figure, after talks collapsed.

"They have refused to save Burundi from sliding into an abyss," said Jean Minani, another opposition figure.

Analysts say renewed conflict in the country could reignite ethnic Hutu-Tutsi violence and bring another humanitarian disaster on the region.

The conflict also risks drawing in neighbouring states - much like in the war-torn east of the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The last civil war in Burundi left at least 300 000 dead.

- Aljazeera


Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...