Create Profile

Creating your profile will enable you to submit photos and stories to get published on News24.

Please provide a username for your profile page:

This username must be unique, cannot be edited and will be used in the URL to your profile page across the entire 24.com network.

Facebook Sign-In

Hi News addict,

Join the News24 Community to be involved in breaking the news.

Log in with Facebook to comment and personalise news, weather and listings.


Cambodians welcome back exiled leader

19 July 2013, 13:02

Phnom Penh - Tens of thousands of jubilant supporters welcomed Cambodia's newly pardoned opposition leader home from exile on Friday as his party fights to end Prime Minister Hun Sen's nearly three decades in power.

Huge crowds gathered outside Phnom Penh's airport and lined the road to the city centre to welcome Sam Rainsy, waving flags and shouting "change, change!"

The French-educated former banker fled in 2009 to avoid charges he contends were politically motivated.

Rainsy kissed the ground at the airport upon returning from France before boarding a truck with his political allies, raising his fist as he greeted a sea of supporters.

"I'm very happy. I came back to rescue the nation with you all," he said before heading in a convoy for Democracy Park, which was packed with people waiting for him to speak.

The 64-year-old had faced 11 years in jail but was pardoned by King Sihamoni last week at Hun Sen's request, clearing the way for his return ahead of elections on 28 July.

US aid

"I'm very happy and excited to see the leader of democracy returning to the country," said Sok Kan, aged 64, who was among those waiting to greet him.

"He is far different from the current leader. He sacrifices everything for the nation," Kuch Narith, aged 26, said.

US lawmakers have called for the United States to cut off aid to Cambodia unless this month's polls are free and fair.

Hun Sen is one of Southeast Asia's longest-serving leaders. His Cambodian People's Party (CPP) won the last two polls by a landslide amid allegations of fraud and election irregularities.

In May Hun Sen, a former Khmer Rouge cadre who defected from the murderous 1970s regime and became premier in 1985, said he would try to stay in power for another decade.

Rainsy said before his return that the pardon was "a small victory for democracy" but also warned that "much more remains to be done".

Galvanising presence

The opposition leader, who is seen as the main challenger to strongman Hun Sen, has been removed from the electoral register and as a result is unable to run as a candidate this month unless parliament amends the law.

But he plans to hit the campaign trail soon to try to boost support for his Cambodia National Rescue Party (CNRP).

"His presence will galvanise activists and voters," said CNRP spokesperson Yim Sovann.

Sovann said the CNRP would discuss possible ways to register Rainsy as a candidate after his return.

The UN's special rapporteur on human rights in Cambodia, Surya Subedi, on Monday urged Cambodia to let Rainsy play a "full part" in politics.

Rainsy left his homeland and moved to Paris aged 16 after the disappearance of his father, a politician believed to have been killed by government agents after a failed coup attempt.

Popular among workers

After earning an MBA from France's INSEAD Business School, he worked for various banks in Paris before setting up his own accountancy firm.

He returned to Cambodia in 1992 and briefly held the post of finance minister.

He fled in 2005 after Hun Sen pressed defamation charges against him but received a royal pardon the following year and returned to the kingdom.

He left Cambodia once again in 2009 and was convicted in his absence for charges including inciting racial discrimination and spreading disinformation.

Experts say Rainsy is popular among many workers thanks to his background as a labour activist dating back to the mid-1990s.

Yet while voters - especially those from poor, rural areas - may admire Rainsy, they find it hard to identify with him given his privileged background, said independent political analyst Chea Vannath.

Unlike Hun Sen, Rainsy neither experienced the Khmer Rouge's reign nor helped to liberate the country from the brutal regime, she said.

"Rainsy had better opportunities to pursue his education while Hun Sen stopped studying to join the liberation [anti-Khmer Rouge] movement in the 1970s," she added.

Hun Sen had previously vowed to hold office until he reached 90. He turns 61 in August but officially lists his age as 62 which he says is the result of a typing error.



Read News24’s Comments Policy

Comment on this story
Comments have been closed for this article.

Read more from our Users

Nigeria @ 56: Words to my green f...

A leader’s job is not to dictate, but rather to be respected, admired and be a trustee, of the land we love, with so much potential, a land which should be freer than free. Its still a long way to fufilling our destiny! Read more...

Submitted by
Isaac Asabor263
Recession: An opportunity for Nig...

The recession should be seen as an opportunity for the country’s promotion as long as we all collectively conduct ourselves in a patriotic manner, writes Isaac Asabor.  Read more...

Submitted by
Black and White

We want to imitate the whites in everything because we are ignorant of our inherent originality and content. We spend all our Naira to acquire his inventions because we so oblivious of our natural endowments that we allow him have it for free. Read more...

Submitted by
Nate Nat
Adamawa State University Mubi: A ...

ADSU integrity forum has accused the Sunday Joshua Wugira, a lawyer, of adopting unorthodox tactics by abusing his privilege by attacking the integrity of ADSU Vice Chancellor Dr. Moses Zira Zaruwa, writes a News24 reader. Read more...

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
My Country Nigeria (Part One)

Poetry by Abdulsalam Jubril.

Submitted by
Abdulsalam Jubril
Recession, dearth in leadership a...

Every leader has the opportunity to become great and making himself immortal in the lives and hearts of people for generations to come. Will Mr. President seize this opportunity?, questions Abdulsalam Jubril. Read more...